Plants

Search by Latin Name:

Showing 1 to 50 of 84 products

Sort By :

product product
Caesalpinia gilliesii
Hardy Bird of Paradise

Hardy Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia gilliesii) is a surprisingly hardy shrub from South America native to Argentina and Uruguay. The extremely fine textured bipennate foliage is fern-like and resembles Mimosa or Amorpha. During spring and summer the lovely foliage takes on a bluish green color. By late summer if conditions are optimal, beautiful flowers appear. The flowers are light yellow with protruding red hair-like stamens that are very showy, drawing in curious visitors. By late fall in our zone 6 climate, the foliage drops and typically the above ground woody part of the shrub freezes back and behaves like a Crapemyrtle or a Butterfly Bush. Trim dead growth in mid-spring and enjoy the new beautiful regrowth by early summer. In order for this shrub to flower, it needs to be well-established, in full sun, and preferably on the south or west side of a foundation. Hardy Bird of Paradise need average to dry well drained soil especially in the winter. Hardiness should not be an issue after seeing mature established plants at the Denver Botanic Garden (zone 5b) in full bloom. The Botanic Garden at Oklahoma State University (zone 7a) also has a few decades old specimens. Wet winter soils could limit its success in zone 5-7 areas in the Eastern United States. It has been thriving in our trial gardens and at several residential gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a) 5-7 years ago. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. It is virtually unknown in most garden centers but worthy of more wide-scale use especially in hot locations.

product product
Calamagrostis brachytricha
Korean Feather Reed Grass
$15.00 $19.50

Korean Feather Reed Grass, is also known as Calamagrostis brachytricha

product product
Callicarpa americana
American Beautyberry
$18.00 $23.40

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), native to Southeast US including Oklahoma and Missouri, is one of the most unique and attractive shrubs for berry production. Considered a three-season shrub, green foliage emerges in spring with attractive clusters of tiny pink flowers in summer. Big conglomerates of fruit clusters occur along the stem at evenly spaced intervals. Bright purple in color, the fruit is very effective through the month of October and November in our Zone 6a Kansas climate. Fall foliage is bright yellow often contrasting with the purple berries in November. By the following spring, winter kill to the ground will almost always occur as temperatures regularly drop to 0 degrees F or below. Cut to a few inches off the ground as you would with a perennial. You may choose to do this rejuvenation anyways in Southern areas if it has not been done in a few years to increase fruit production on vigorous new growth. New shoots create fountain-shaped shrub 3-4’ after rejuvenation. Flowering occurs on new wood so you will always have berries when using this method. Purple berry clusters are highly ornamental and eaten only very slowly (never stripped clean) by birds. In southern parts of its range, full to part shade is best. However, full to part sun is recommended in zone 6 to maximize energy production needed from the sun in a shorter growing season. Mild drought is tolerated at the expense of dropping fruits if it gets too dry. Our plants in the display garden survived the winter of 2021 with temperatures reaching -16 degrees F coming up reliably from the ground each year. Overall, this is a great "woody perennial" for the Kansas landscape that is unfortunately often underused.

product product
Callicarpa dichotoma 'Early Amethyst'
Early Amethyst Purple Beautyberry
$18.00 $23.40

Purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma 'Early Amethyst'), native to Asia, is one of the most unique and attractive shrubs for berry production. Considered a three-season shrub, green foliage emerges in spring with attractive clusters of tiny pink flowers in summer. Big conglomerates of fruit clusters occur along the stem at evenly spaced intervals. Bright purple in color, the fruit is very effective through the month of October and November in our Zone 6a Kansas climate. Fall foliage is bright yellow often contrasting with the purple berries in November. The following spring, watch for winter kill if temperatures drop below -5 to -10 degrees F and be prepared to cut to a few inches off the ground. You may choose to do this rejuvenation anyways if it has not been done in a few years to increase fruit production on vigorous new growth. New shoots create fountain-shaped shrub 3-4’ after rejuvenation. Flowering occurs on new wood so you will always have berries when using this method. Purple berry clusters are highly ornamental but rarely eaten (or stripped clean) by birds. Beautyberry grow best in part to full sun but can also tolerate almost full shade and still produce fruit. This makes them valuable for a north side of the house planting that only gets a couple of months of sun during the high sun angle peak of summer. Mild drought is tolerated at the expense of dropping fruits if it gets too dry. Our plants in the display garden survived without irrigation but did not fruit during the extreme drought of 2011. Overall this is a great plant for the landscape that is unfortunately often underused.

product product
Callirhoe bushii
Upright Bush Poppy Mallow / Winecups
$13.00 $16.90

Upright Winecups (Callirhoe bushii) is also called Bush's Poppy Mallow. This plant grows from a carrot like taproot sporting a cluster of semi evergreen foliage around the base. In spring, new upright and prostrate growing vines spread in all directions along the ground up to 3 to 4 feet away from the taproot but do not root along the way. By late May or early June, magenta red “wine cup” shaped flowers cover this plant. The show last for about 4 to 6 weeks or until severe summer drought sets in. Usually in July, the flowering is complete and will set seed if allowed. Foliage will look bedraggled enough to justify complete cut back. This may be a good time to mulch unless you already mulched during the spring. When cooler weather returns in the fall, new growth emerges from the taproot looking attractive again. Secondary flowering may also occur in early fall….especially on summer planted plants. Bush's Poppy Mallow is a rare native wildflower of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and Oklahoma in rocky open woods and ravine bottoms. Bush's Poppy Mallow appreciates well drained soil and full to part sun. However we have found that it will still bloom and tolerate almost full shade (just a couple hours) if needed and our 40 inches of rain per year. A great plant for the top of a retaining wall, native pollinator gardens, or to even among other perennials to provide texture and contrast. It’s one Achilles’ heel is rabbits. Rabbits are usually only a problem in crowded suburbs where they have a little wild vegetation to eat and no predators. Gardeners with lots of established plants usually do not have rabbit problems. If rabbits are a problem for you, and you still want to grow upright wine cups, cover the plant with a bowl shaped piece of chicken wire attached with weed barrier pins. This will allow the taproot and basil foliage to get established the first year without any browsing (flowers may get eaten); after removing the cage the second year, the plants will generally outgrow any rabbit browsing. Other problems could be root rot but I have generally not seen that even in clay soils in Lawrence Kansas. Self seeding should be allowed to gently occur around the base of the plant to ensure a thick groundcover; these plants tolerate crowded conditions and will not crowd each other out or need division. This is one of the most iconic and beautiful native wildflowers!

product product
Callirhoe involucrata
Magenta Poppy Mallow / Winecups
$10.00 $13.00

Wine cup (Callirhoe involucrata) is also called purple poppy mallow. This plant grows from a carrot like taproot sporting a cluster of semi evergreen foliage around the base. In spring, new prostrate growing vines spread in all directions along the ground up to 3 to 4 feet away from the taproot but do not root along the way. By late May or early June, magenta red “wine cup” shaped flowers cover this plant. The show last for about 4 to 6 weeks or until severe summer drought sets in. Usually in July, the flowering is complete and will set seed if allowed. Foliage will look bedraggled enough to justify complete cut back. This may be a good time to mulch unless you already mulched during the spring. When cooler weather returns in the fall, new growth emerges from the taproot looking attractive again. Secondary flowering may also occur in early fall….especially on summer planted plants. Poppy mallow winecup is a native plant of the great plains south to Texas and includes most of Kansas. As with most plants native to prairie areas, winecup appreciates well drained soil and full sun. However we have found that it will tolerate almost full shade if needed and our 40 inches of rain per year. A great plant for the top of a retaining wall, native pollinator gardens, or to even among other perennials to provide texture and contrast. It’s one Achilles’ heel is rabbits. Rabbits are usually only a problem in crowded suburbs where they have a little wild vegetation to eat and no predators. Gardeners with lots of established plants usually do not have rabbit problems. If rabbits are a problem for you, and you still want to grow wine cups, cover the plant with a bowl shaped piece of chicken wire attached with weed barrier pins. This will allow the taproot and basil foliage to get established the first year without any browsing; after removing the cage the second year, the plants will generally outgrow any rabbit browsing. Other problems could be root rot but I have generally not seen that even in clay soils in Lawrence Kansas. Self seeding should be allowed to gently occur around the base of the plant to ensure a thick groundcover; these plants tolerate crowded conditions and will not crowd each other out or need division. This is one of the most iconic and beautiful native wildflowers!

product product
Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite'
Aphrodite Sweetshrub / Calycanthus
$8.00 $10.40

Aphrodite Sweetshrub (Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite') is covered in big, glossy, medium-green leaves. This shrub explodes with enormous cupped flowers that look a bit like a deep red magnolia. They start in early summer with a big flush of flowers continuing to bloom sporadically all summer long. This is a quite large shrub that needs plenty of space to look its best, but if you have the room for it, there are few better ways to use it! 'Aphrodite' is a hybrid between our native Calycanthus and the Asian species, x Sinocalycanthus. You're probably wondering if it's fragrant, and the answer is - it depends. The scent varies based on the age of the bloom, the time of day, and the flower itself. Some people say they smell like pineapple, others apples, others bubblegum, and some get no scent at all. Even if you never sense a whiff off this plant, its fabulous flowers are more than enough reward. Prune after flowering to maintain shape. This Calycanthus performs amazingly well in eastern Kansas landscapes. It is great along a woodland edge or in morning sun. When planted in full shade with rich soil in our Lawrence, KS Zone 6a display garden, growth is very rapid and flowers completely cover the shrub for a few weeks in early summer. Yes, you heard right, this shrub is will flower in full shade. It tolerates a wide variety of soil types including clay but needs prefers well-drained soil high in organic matter. Adaptable to mild drought and heat (plant in full shade in southern zones) but greatly improved with rich, moisture-retentive soils. Typically, our 40 inches of rainfall per year in Eastern Kansas is sufficient. Summer foliage is virtually pest-free. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Canna 'Australia'
Dark Red-leaf Water Canna (Tropical)
$25.00 $32.50

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Australia' has maroon leaves and red flowers. This canna can also grow in standing water as a potted plant in water gardens or rain gardens.

product product
Canna 'Cannova Bronze Scarlet'
Cannova Bronze Scarlet Dwarf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Cannova Bronze Scarlet' is a dwarf variety with reddish leaves and bright red flowers.

product product
Canna 'Cannova Orange Shades'
Cannova Orange Shades Dwarf Canna
$8.00 $10.40

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Cannova Orange Shades' is a dwarf variety with green leaves and bright orange flowers.

product product
Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo'
Daddy Buckaroo Giant Red-Leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo' is a tall variety with reddish-green leaves and red-orange flowers. This variety is among the most cold hardy of the cannas due to its vigorous deep growing rhizomes. Our original plant came from Brian's Botanicals mail-order nursery in Kentucky.

product product
Canna 'Omega'
Omega Hardy Green-leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Omega' is a tall variety with blue-green leaves and orange flowers. This variety is the most cold hardy of the cannas due to its vigorous deep growing rhizomes. The rate of spread is faster so provide a larger space for this plant. This canna can also grow in standing water as a potted plant in water gardens or rain gardens.

product product
Canna gereralis
Mixed Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower.

product product
Canna glauca 'Panache'
Panache Native Canna
$40.00 $52.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna glauca 'Panache' is a native canna to South-east U.S. with blue-green leaves and salmon-pink to peach flowers. This canna can also grow in standing water as a potted plant or in a rain garden.

product product
Canna indica 'Ellens Super Orange'
Ellens Super Orange Flowering Red-leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange' is a tall variety with reddish-green leaves and bright orange flowers. This variety is among the most cold hardy of the cannas due to its vigorous deep growing rhizomes. Our original plant came from a residential garden in Lawrence, KS.

product product
Canna indica 'Red Stripe'
Red Stripe Hardy Red-Leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna indica 'Red Stripe' is a medium variety with reddish-green leaves and red flowers.

product product
Canna indica 'Wyoming'
Wyoming Red-leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna indica 'Wyoming' is a medium variety with reddish-green leaves and bright orange flowers.

product product
Carex albicans
White-Tinged Sedge
$10.00 $13.00

Carex albicans, commonly called White-Tinged Sedge, is native to eastern North America, where its typical natural habitat is dry forests and woodlands. It forms a weed-suppressing grass-like clump 12" tall with brown seed heads dangling above. Bright green foliage is extremely fine-textured and hair-like. White-Tinged Sedge is one of the most drought tolerant of the sedges earning a spot in the dry shade garden; it cannot handle extreme drought or extremely rootbound soils though. Root rot can be a problem in poor drainage areas. It prefers average to dry garden conditions with dappled or morning sun. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° so avoid full afternoon sun. Plantings can thrive for many years if in the right spot and there is no such thing as overcrowding. The growth rate is slow at first but eventually forms a nice weed resistant cover so space new plants relatively close together is desiring this effect.

product product
Carex appalachica
Appalachian Sedge
$10.00 $13.00

Carex appalachica, commonly called Appalachian Sedge, is native to It is native to the eastern North America, where its typical natural habitat is dry forests and woodlands. It forms a weed-suppressing grass-like clump 12" tall with brown seed heads dangling above. Bright green foliage is extremely fine-textured and hair-like. White-Tinged Sedge is one of the most drought tolerant of the sedges earning a spot in the dry shade garden; it cannot handle extreme drought or extremely rootbound soils though. Root rot can be a problem in poor drainage areas. It prefers average to dry garden conditions with dappled or morning sun. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° so avoid full afternoon sun. Plantings can thrive for many years if in the right spot and there is no such thing as overcrowding. The growth rate is slow at first but eventually forms a nice weed resistant cover so space new plants relatively close together is desiring this effect.

product product
Carex pensylvanica
Oak Sedge
$10.00 $13.00

>>>>>Oak Sedge (Carex pensylvanica) is planted for its attractive grass-like green foliage>>>>>. Foliage maintains well all year provided that certain cultural conditions are met. Carex plantaginea is native to rich deciduous forests in the eastern United States up to Canada. While it excels in moist shaded sites in calcareous soils, it can adapt to difficult dry shaded sites quite well once established. If low temperatures hit 5 degrees F, foliage finally back to the ground and re-emerges in early spring. Generally this plant can decline after a few years of Kansas climate but worth a try in reasonable soils in well-tended shade gardens. Tolerates moderate dry shade with regular weeding: competition with weeds seem to be an issue in low maintenance gardens.

product product
Carica papaya
Papaya (Tropical)
$40.00 $52.00

Papaya (Tropical), is also known as Carica papaya

product product
Carya illinoinensis
Hardy Pecan
$90.00 $117.00

***Tree descriptions available with future update!***

product product
Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Beyond Midnight'
Beyond Midnight Caryopteris / Bluebeard
$18.00 $23.40

Beyond Midnight® Bluebeard (Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Beyond Midnight') is dark and dreamy! You'll love this new caryopteris - it has extremely dark, glossy foliage, a compact habit, and deep blue flowers. It adds much-needed color to the late summer landscape and makes a handsome companion with perennials. A great favorite with pollinators of all types! Top three reasons to grow Beyond Midnight® caryopteris: 1. Adds fresh color to the landscape late in the season. 2. Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. 3. Better color and habit than other caryopteris. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated well. Cold tolerance is no problem for us in zone 6. Caryopteris gives great winter interest with it's dried flowers. The only maintenance this shrub needs is cutting back about 1/2 way in early spring before new growth emerges. No disease or pest problems. Great plant for berms or hot West or South exposures in full sun. Do not plant in rich moist soils or root rot will probably occur. Even when not blooming, the compact green foliage looks good on it's own or combines well with earlier season blooming red, purple, blue, or magenta flowering plants. Combine with crapemyrtles and butterflybush to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators!

product product
Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Dark Knight'
Dark Knight Caryopteris / Bluebeard
$18.00 $23.40

Dark Knight Caryopteris (Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Dark Knight') features darker green summer foliage followed by late-summer deep blue flowers and a compact growing habit. It adds much-needed color to the late summer landscape and makes a handsome companion with perennials. A great favorite with pollinators of all types (bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds) in the late season garden. Caryopteris demands a sunny spot and very well-drained soil. Wet soils, particularly those that remain soggy during periods of cold weather, will cause root rot. For this reason, we recommend early season planting of caryopteris in zones 5. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated well. Cold tolerance is no problem for us in zone 6. Caryopteris gives great winter interest with it's dried flowers. The only maintenance this shrub needs is cutting back about 1/2 way in early spring before new growth emerges. No disease or pest problems. Great plant for berms or hot West or South exposures in full sun. Do not plant in rich moist soils or root rot will probably occur. Even when not blooming, the compact green foliage looks good on it's own or combines well with earlier season blooming red, purple, blue, or magenta flowering plants. Combine with crapemyrtles and butterflybush to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators!

product product
Caryopteris x clandonensis 'First Choice'
First Choice Caryopteris / Bluebeard
$18.00 $23.40

First Choice Caryopteris (Caryopteris x clandonensis 'First Choice') blooms earlier than other earlier caryopteris. This shrub develops a compact, tight habit with dark green foliage and deep blue long-lasting flowers. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated well. Cold tolerance is no problem for us in zone 6. Caryopteris gives great winter interest with it's dried flowers. The only maintenance this shrub needs is cutting back about 1/2 way in early spring before new growth emerges. No disease or pest problems. Great plant for berms or hot West or South exposures in full sun. Do not plant in rich moist soils or root rot will probably occur. Even when not blooming, the compact green foliage looks good on it's own or combines well with earlier season blooming red, purple, blue, or magenta flowering plants. Combine with crape myrtles and butterfly bush to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators!

product product
Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Lil Miss Sunshine'
Lil Miss Sunshine Caryopteris / Bluebeard
$20.00 $26.00

Lil Miss Sunshine® Bluebeard (Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Lil Miss Sunshine') shows off vivid color from spring through frost! Among the most colorful of all garden plants, spring foliage emerges bright gold lasting all summer. In late summer, blue flowers begin to appear and persist through mid-autumn with unforgettable contrast. It's late season bloom time brings interest to the landscape when not much else is blooming and the nectar-rich flowers provide food for pollinating insects and hummingbirds. Compact size works well in perennial gardens or landscape beds. Excellent as part of the mixed border or in the perennial bed, it adds a shot of bold color to the late summer garden. Fertilize with a controlled release fertilizer in spring. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated well. Cold tolerance is no problem for us in zone 6. Caryopteris gives great winter interest with it's dried flowers. Tip dieback is common after cold winters. The only maintenance this shrub needs is cutting back about 1/2 way in early spring before new growth emerges. In Northern areas it may die completely to the ground. The plant blooms on the current season's growth so will flower even if cut to the ground in spring. Great plant for berms or hot West or South exposures in full sun. No disease or pest problems except root rot; do not plant in rich moist soils or root rot will probably occur. Even when not blooming, the intense gold foliage looks good on it's own or combines well with earlier season blooming red, purple, blue, or magenta flowering plants. Combine with crapemyrtles and butterflybush to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators! All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Cassia / Senna alata
Yellow Candlestick Tree (Tropical)
$10.00 $13.00

Yellow Candlestick Tree (Cassia / Senna alata) is grown in Kansas as a giant annual capable of reaching 6 to 12 feet in one season. Growth is slow at first in Spring when temperatures are still cool. It is native to tropical rainforests in Mexico and South America generally fulfilling the role of a pioneer species rapidly colonizing disturbed areas. Bright green bi-pinnate leaves are symmetrically arranged and very tropical looking. As branching and growth form develop, the overall geometrical effect is stunning even without flowers yet. Finally by September and all through October until frost, yellow candle-like flowers tower over the foliage. Some plants may have up to 50-100 flower spikes at one time. Cut down promptly after frost as there is no winter interest. Seeds rarely have time to develop in our shorter growing season but it is possible to harvest seeds if the first fall freeze is late. Yellow Candlestick Tree grows fastest in rich well drained soils and plenty of water. Growth is equally impressive in most Kansas soils including heavy clay as long as watering is sufficient. Yellow Candlestick Tree needs hot summers, full sun, and warm humid conditions to thrive. When grown in a large pot, it is very difficult to overwinter inside so it’s best to buy new plants each year. This plant has also evolved and interesting relationship with ants, providing nectary glands (food) in exchange for protection from insect pests. Use Yellow Candlestick Tree where you need to fill up a lot of space in a hurry or just like lots of yellow flowers in the fall when other things are not blooming. Interestingly, the foliage is sensitive to light, folding up neatly at sunset and opening up the nest morning.

product product
Cassia didymobotrya
Popcorn Plant (Tropical)
$10.00 $13.00

***Description for this plant available with future update!***

product product
Castanea mollissima
Chinese Chestnut
$90.00 $117.00

***Tree descriptions available with future update!***

product product
Catalpa speciosa
Northern Catalpa
$90.00 $117.00

***Tree descriptions available with future update!***

product product
Ceanothus americanus
New Jersey Tea
$15.00 $19.50

***Shrub descriptions available with future update!***

product product
Celosia argentea var. spicata 'Flamingo Feather'
Flamingo Feather Celosia (Tropical)
$8.00 $10.40

Flamingo Feather Celosia (Celosia argentea var. spicata 'Flamingo Feather') is a large magenta flowering annual. Growth starts off in May when temperatures have warmed. Beautiful dark green foliage has reddish colored back sides of the leaf and magenta stems. After achieving about 3 to 4 feet in height and wide, fuzzy magenta flower spikes begin to appear usually by July. Ultimate height can reach 5-6 feet as flowering becomes more dense and continues until frost providing an excellent long-lasting show. Celosia has little winter interests so you may cut down promptly after the first fall freeze. This is a time to save some of the seeds if you wish to sprinkle them in a new area next year. You may or may not enjoy the fact that the Celosia will easily re-seed itself in areas that you do not mulch. Seedlings come up rather late and can create a carpet under the previous years planting location. We usually allow self-seeding to occur in our display garden in select areas and then spray Roundup or mulch wherever you do not want seedlings. Flamingo Feather Celosia needs full sun for best flowering but tolerated virtually any soil conditions including compacted driveway gravel. Use Flamingo Feather Celosia where you need to fill up a lot of space in a hurry or just like lots of magenta flowers in the fall when other things are not blooming. Celosia is also grown as a food crop in Africa and Southeast Asia.

product product
Celtis occidentalis
Hackberry
$90.00 $117.00

Hackberry, is also known as Celtis occidentalis

product product
Cephalanthus occidentalis 'Sugar Shack'
Sugar Shack Dwarf Buttonbush
$18.00 $23.40

Button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is a beautiful rounded shrub with glossy green leaves that turn reddish maroon in fall. White flowers are very unique (and look like a coronavirus) consisting of small spheres with protruding anthers. Bloom occurs all summer and are attractive to many different bee and butterfly species, including the swallowtail butterfly. Red fruiting heads appear in late summer adding to the ornamental appeal! In its native habitat covering most of Eastern United States including disjunct populations in Arizona, California, and Mexico, this wetland shrub can be found in low-lying areas. This includes swamps, marshes, bogs, wetlands, and along the edges of ponds, streams, and rivers. In Eastern Kansas, this is a no-brainer shrub to small tree for average garden soils including heavy clay and useful for rain gardens. Adapts to a wide range of soils except dry ones if in poor soils. Tolerant of moderate drought once established especially if in moisture-retentive rich soils. As a testament to this plants survivability, Clinton Lake and Perry Lake located in NE kansas flooded in 2020 with areas of shore-line underwater for the entire growing season. This killed every other plant species was killed except for buttonbush: all top growth was killed but new shoots from the root systems of thousands of plants along the shore resumed the following year when water receded. Basically, these plants survived over 18 months with no growth from fall of 2019 to spring of 2021. This plant can also grow in permanent standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Sugar Shack® Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis 'Sugar Shack') in a new Proven Winners variety! Although buttonbush has long been prized as a native and great for rain gardens, it was way too big for most landscapes. Not anymore! They cut the size in half and added improved colorful red fruit and glossy foliage. Add in cool looking, fragrant white flowers and you've got a delightful plant that shines from spring to fall. Blooming on new wood, button bush may be trimmed in early spring. Complete rejuvenation may also be done if plants get too big.

product product
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
Creeping Plumbago / Leadwort
$4.00 $5.20

Creeping Plumbago / Leadwort (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides) is a Chinese native plant well adapted to our climate without being invasive in Kansas. It features nonstop royal blue flowers from midsummer till hard freeze; Usually three months or more. After a first light freeze, if flowering is still occurring, rich green foliage will turn bright red while still containing a few blue flowers. This creates a one-of-a-kind contrast not seen in any other plants. Plumbago combines well with just about any other plant due to its rare flower color. This is especially dramatic is combining it with opposites on the color wheel like orange, red or yellow. Growth is often slow to emerge in the spring as plumbago needs warmer soil than most other plants to start growing. This allows for a good combination for spring bulbs to grow with plumbago coming up later to hide the dying bulb foliage. In Kansas landscapes, plumbago is often used as a full sun groundcover in hot areas such as west or south side of the house. Normal garden conditions and berms are fine as well. Plants can survive and flower in shade but growth will be much slower and risk of death will be present until established. In zone 6a, all plantings should be mulched and only larger size established pots should be planted if in the fall. Plumbago sold in flats of many smaller plants can safely be planted in spring or summer. Plumbago needs medium to dry soil tolerating clay as long as everything as well-drained. Once plants are established for a season or two in full sun, they are nearly indestructible. Slow spread will occur and plants will develop very high density smothering out weeds. Sometimes the slowly spreading growth (underground rhizones) can be a problem after a decade or so. However, if you plan ahead and use it as a groundcover like intended, it will be perfect. Being a very low maintenance plant not requiring extra watering or deadheading, the only thing you need to do is weed-eat or cut back all the foliage in the winter. Plumbago has no pest or disease problems.

product product
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
Creeping Plumbago / Leadwort-flat
$80.00 $104.00

Creeping Plumbago / Leadwort (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides) is a Chinese native plant well adapted to our climate without being invasive in Kansas. It features nonstop royal blue flowers from midsummer till hard freeze; Usually three months or more. After a first light freeze, if flowering is still occurring, rich green foliage will turn bright red while still containing a few blue flowers. This creates a one-of-a-kind contrast not seen in any other plants. Plumbago combines well with just about any other plant due to its rare flower color. This is especially dramatic is combining it with opposites on the color wheel like orange, red or yellow. Growth is often slow to emerge in the spring as plumbago needs warmer soil than most other plants to start growing. This allows for a good combination for spring bulbs to grow with plumbago coming up later to hide the dying bulb foliage. In Kansas landscapes, plumbago is often used as a full sun groundcover in hot areas such as west or south side of the house. Normal garden conditions and berms are fine as well. Plants can survive and flower in shade but growth will be much slower and risk of death will be present until established. In zone 6a, all plantings should be mulched and only larger size established pots should be planted if in the fall. Plumbago sold in flats of many smaller plants can safely be planted in spring or summer. Plumbago needs medium to dry soil tolerating clay as long as everything as well-drained. Once plants are established for a season or two in full sun, they are nearly indestructible. Slow spread will occur and plants will develop very high density smothering out weeds. Sometimes the slowly spreading growth (underground rhizones) can be a problem after a decade or so. However, if you plan ahead and use it as a groundcover like intended, it will be perfect. Being a very low maintenance plant not requiring extra watering or deadheading, the only thing you need to do is weed-eat or cut back all the foliage in the winter. Plumbago has no pest or disease problems.

product product
Cercis canadensis
Eastern Redbud
$40.00 $52.00

Eastern Redbud, is also known as Cercis canadensis

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Burgandy Hearts'
Burgandy Hearts Purple-Leaf Redbud

Cercis canadensis Burgundy Hearts® is an improved reddish purple-leaf variety developed by Greenleaf Nurseries in Oklahoma. Burgundy Hearts more drought and heat tolerant. Pinkish-lavender April flowers bloom for about a month before leaves appear. It has a more or less rounded form, wider than it is tall. This small deciduous tree is known for its heart-shaped leaves that hold their dark color longer in the summer, taking on reddish wine tones towards the fall. Many of the problems with the regular species redbud tree are not an issue with this improved cultivar. It is to be expected however that all Redbuds have a relatively short lifespan of 20-40 years but even so, are worth planting for its beautiful flowers. It is not weak wooded and makes a nice hot non-sparking firewood. The short life span is not due to breakage so much as it is to the tree's susceptibility to heart-rot especially when branch crotches form and get older. Other problems include canker, verticillium wilt and root rot. Most redbud varieties thrive in full sun to partial shade. They will tolerate full shade but become elongated and thin as they reach for the sun. Redbuds do well in most soil types but adequate drainage is a must; it can tolerate dry shade of Eastern Kansas forests receiving at least 35" of rainfall per year. The species is a native from southern Canada to Florida, east to Kansas. The regular species also has the potential to self seed in your yard but not Burgundy Hearts. As a dwarf tree, use ‘Merlot’ as a specimen or part of a group. It reaches about 20 to 30 feet high and wide in full sun. Reddish leaf color emerges in the spring and is maintained all summer long if in mostly full sun. The color of older purple redbuds (like Forest Pansy) fades to dark green as the summer heat intensifies.

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Don Egolf'
Don Egolf Redbud
$15.00 $19.50

Don Egolf Redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Don Egolf') is a dwarf flowering shrub redbud native to China. It has the typical heart shaped green Redbud foliage and deep magenta flowers. The bark is more of a beige or light tan color with black buds. Flowering begins in April with flower buds starting on old wood all the way to the ground level. Flowering even occurs on very young plants only several inches tall. Because this is a Chinese species, no seed pods form like on native Redbuds. After many years, heights of 8 to 10 feet may be achieved on multi-stemmed plants. Culture conditions are pretty easy; just provide average garden soil, reasonable water, and mostly sun. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water if planted in good soils. Don Eagles Red has been growing in our display garden for over 10 years blooming consistently with no problems. It survived -16 degrees F and a week of single digit highs in February, 2021 with no damage to flower buds.

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Merlot'
Merlot Purple-Leaf Redbud

This purple-leaf Redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Merlot') is a canadensis and texensis cross to produce a more drought and heat tolerant tree. It has glossy, small rounded dark purple leaves and has an upright vase-shaped growth habit. This small deciduous tree is known for its stunning display of colorful blooms a deep magenta color. Many of the problems with the regular species redbud tree are not an issue with this improved cultivar. It is to be expected however that all Redbuds have a relatively short lifespan of 20-40 years but even so, are worth planting for its beautiful flowers. It is not weak wooded and makes a nice hot non-sparking firewood. The short life span is not due to breakage so much as it is to the tree's susceptibility to heart-rot especially when branch crotches form and get older. Other problems include canker, verticillium wilt and root rot. Most redbud varieties thrive in full sun to partial shade. They will tolerate full shade but become elongated and thin as they reach for the sun. Redbuds do well in most soil types but adequate drainage is a must; it can tolerate dry shade of Eastern Kansas forests receiving at least 35" of rainfall per year. The species is a native from southern Canada to Florida, east to Kansas. The regular species also has the potential to self seed in your yard but not 'Merlot'. As a dwarf tree, use ‘Merlot’ as a specimen or part of a group. It reaches about 12 to 15 feet high and wide in full sun. Reddish leaf color emerges in the spring and is maintained all summer long if in mostly full sun. The color of older purple redbuds (like Forest Pansy) fades to dark green as the summer heat intensifies.

product product
Cereus peruvianus
Peruvian Apple Cactus (Tropical)
$50.00 $65.00

Grown for its beautiful bluish-green skin and showy night-blooming white flowers. Unlike most columnar cacti, Peruvian apple cactus (Cereus peruvianus) will bloom at a young age in a pot when about 3' tall or more. This cactus is usually grown as a patio or house plant in Kansas and blooms in late summer into early fall. Flowers only last one night! In the wild, this species is hardy to 20-25 degrees F for short periods of time. Grow in full sun with optional extra watering including that which comes from rainfall. Repotting may or may not be needed depending on how large you want the plant to grow; plants can continue to grow taller and tolerate extremely root-bound pots but may need wind bracing. If repotting, make sure to use a sharp draining medium organic cactus mix with plenty of sand and perlite. To play is safe, potted plants are best moved in before night temperatures get below 45 degrees F. It is important to avoid the combination of wet and cold. Before extreme cold occurs, move to a bright interior window over the winter with no watering and keep above freezing. As a winter house plant, it will look presentable all winter long with just no waterings. As a permanent house plant, provide bright light and allow the soil to dry between waterings for many years of carefree enjoyment. Plants grown permanently indoors may begin to elongate stretching for light producing weak new growth. It can be hard to reproduce the intense UV sunlight they need so moving outside for the summer is best. Generally if moving outside for the summer, allow 1-2 weeks of part shade or morning sun before placing in full sun. Plants with time to acclimate will thrive in full sun but be careful not to rush it or sunburning will occur. Potted plants are very low maintenance. I have never seen any insect problems on this plant. Potted plants are capable of growing 10' tall or more in a small 7gal pot.

product product
Ceropegia woodii
String of Hearts (Tropical)
$18.00 $23.40

Ceropegia woodii known as the Rosary Vine and String of Hearts. This unusual, hardy vining succulent produces pretty, variegated, heart-shaped leaves with purple undersides on tough, wire-like stems. They are usually grown as a patio or house plant in Kansas. String of Hearts also grow well in hanging baskets as a durable, succulent plant able to survive drying out, heat and dry air like few others! If conditions get too rough, the foliage simply dies back and growth returns from underground tubers when favorable conditions return. To play is safe, potted plants are best moved in before night temperatures get below 45 degrees F. It is important to avoid the combination of wet and cold. Before extreme cold occurs, move to a bright interior window over the winter with no watering and keep above freezing. As a winter house plant, it will look presentable all winter long with just no waterings. As a permanent house plant, provide bright light and allow the soil to dry between waterings for many years of carefree enjoyment. Plants grown permanently indoors may begin to elongate stretching for light producing weak new growth. It can be hard to reproduce the intense UV sunlight they need so moving outside for the summer is best. Generally if moving outside for the summer, allow 1-2 weeks of part shade or morning sun before placing in full sun. Plants with time to acclimate will thrive in full sun but be careful not to rush it or sunburning will occur. Potted plants are very low maintenance. I have never seen any insect problems on this plant.

product product
Chaenomeles 'Double Take Orange'
Double Take Orange Flowering Quince
$18.00 $23.40

Double Take® Orange Quince (Chaenomeles 'Double Take Orange') features huge flowers on a thornless plant. It's so beautiful you may overlook its survivalist skills! Heat and drought tolerant, this plant will delight you each spring with candy colored blooms. Double Take Orange puts on a spectacular spring display of large double flowers with intense orange color - you'll do a double take! More than just pretty flowers, the Double Take Quinces are easy to care for, having neither thorns or fruit. Once established, they are extremely drought tolerant. Developed by Dr. Tom Ranney and his team at the Mountain Crops Research & Extension Center in beautiful North Carolina, Orange Storm and the other Double Take Quinces are sure to brighten spring gardens across the United States. Uses Notes: Excellent for hedging, mass planting and cut flower gardens. A spectacular early season specimen for the mixed border. Maintenance Notes: Prune to shape after flowering. Apply a controlled release fertilizer in spring. Formerly known as Double Take 'Orange Storm' quince. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated reasonably well but with some foliage decline by late summer and no fall color. This is made up for by the extremely reliable blooming season that fills up the month of April when many other plants are not in full swing yet. Cold tolerance or flower bud loss is no problem in our zone 6. No serious disease or pest problems. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Chaenomeles 'Double Take Pink'
Double Take Pink Flowering Quince
$18.00 $23.40

Double Take® Pink Quince (Chaenomeles 'Double Take Pink') features huge flowers on a thornless plant! You'll do a double take when you see this quince that looks like a camellia. Double Take Pink puts on a spectacular early season display of pink blooms. The large, double flowers are excellent in cut flower arrangements. Bright spring flowers are only the beginning of the Double Take quince's appeal: they're also thornless, and do not produce fruit. Extremely drought tolerant once established, these early spring charmers are excellent landscape plants and real survivalists in tough climates. Developed by Dr. Tom Ranney and his team at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in beautiful North Carolina, they are sure to brighten spring landscapes across the United States.Uses Notes: Intense early spring color is excellent for mixed borders and cutting gardens. Also good for hedging and mass plantings. Maintenance Notes: Trim to shape after flowering. Apply a controlled release fertilizer in spring. Formerly sold as Double Take 'Pink Storm' quince. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated reasonably well but with some foliage decline by late summer and no fall color. This is made up for by the extremely reliable blooming season that fills up the month of April when many other plants are not in full swing yet. Cold tolerance or flower bud loss is no problem in our zone 6. No serious disease or pest problems. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Chaenomeles 'Double Take Scarlet'
Double Take Scarlet Flowering Quince
$18.00 $23.40

You'll do a double take when you see this quince that looks like a camellia. Double Take Scarlet Quince (Chaenomeles 'Double Take Scarlet') puts on a spectacular early spring display of large red, double flowers. The Double Take quinces are more than just pretty spring flowers: thornless and deer-resistant, they do not produce fruit, and once established, are drought-tolerant survivalists. Developed by Dr. Tom Ranney and his team at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in beautiful North Carolina, the Double Take quinces are sure to brighten spring landscapes across the United States. Uses Notes: Bright early spring flowers are great in mixed borders or cutting gardens. Also good for hedging and mass plantings. Maintenance Notes: Trim to shape after flowering. Apply a controlled release fertilizer in early spring. Formerly sold as Double Take 'Scarlet Storm' quince. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated reasonably well but with some foliage decline by late summer and no fall color. This is made up for by the extremely reliable blooming season that fills up the month of April when many other plants are not in full swing yet. Cold tolerance or flower bud loss is no problem in our zone 6. No serious disease or pest problems. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Gold Mop'
Gold Mop False Cypress
$22.00 $28.60

Gold Mop False Cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Gold Mop') is from a group of small coniferous shrubs from Asia with Juniper-like foliage. The foliage is bright yellow, thread-like and creates a relatively low, semi-weeping habit. It provides consistent color during spring, summer, fall, and darkens to a more gold color by winter providing excellent color when most other plants are dormant. Full sun and average garden conditions are preferred. Maintenance is pretty easy, only prune when needed to control size. Do not prune in late summer or fall. Coloring is definitely best if the plant can receive winter sun. Combine in the summer with other flowering perennials and shrubs. Combine in the winter with ornamental grasses, yuccas, Nandinas, or winter interest plants that contrast with gold.

product product
Chasmanthium latifolium
Northern / Inland Sea Oats
$15.00 $19.50

Northern / Inland Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) is a grass native to the central and eastern United States including some areas in the southwest. Sea Oats is grown is notable for its large graceful seedheads and ability to tolerate full shade. Sending up blue-green spools of basal leaves in spring, it will grow to 2 feet tall with green seed heads starting to form earlier than most other grasses. As it turns a vivid green by June, the translucent green seedheads swaying in the breeze. By mid-summer, the seeds will have turned an attractive ivory and will turn brown in a few months before dropping off in fall. It looks attractive into late fall but becomes tattered after seeds drop making it a good grass to cut back in the late fall or early winter instead of Spring. For the home garden in rich well irrigated areas, this species can be too aggressive from self-seeding to mix with other plants. Use as a mass planting in any shaded area allowing extra room. However, in a difficult dry-shade garden, it will thrive, flower, and be relatively tame without much spread. Mulch will also stop self-seeding. It is one of the few plants that can survive under an established Silver Maple! Now if you need a plant to prevent soil erosion along streams, use this reseeding to your advantage! As it reseeds easily and can expand aggressively within a couple of years, it makes a solid root mat in moist erosion-prone loam soils.

Schedule an Appointment

No product is added to the cart!

Product has been added to the cart!