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Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Pink'
Center Stage Pink Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Pink' is a new Proven Winners® release. This 3-5' shrub features deep black foliage and pink flowers with yellow stamens; it truly will command center stage in your landscape. Note that this cultivar is wood hardy down to zone 6b. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Red'
Center Stage Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Red' is a new Proven Winners® release. This 3-5' shrub features deep black foliage and glowing red flowers; it truly will command center stage in your landscape. Note that this cultivar is wood hardy down to zone 6b. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Lagerstroemia 'Dark Roast'
Dark Roast Dwarf Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°F, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia 'Dark Roast' is a Walters Gardens, Inc. selection and part of its BARISTA® Collection. It features dark foliage with leaves having red undertones, especially near the tips of the stems. In late summer to early fall, bright fuchsia pink flowers are produced over the fully rounded, compact habit. This is a dwarf selection growing 18-30" tall and wood hardy to about zone 6b. (estimated)

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Lagerstroemia 'Enduring Red'
Enduring Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Enduring™ Red Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia 'PIILAG B5') features clusters of bright true scarlet-red blooms appear all summer against the glossy green foliage. Leaves emerge red and turn to dark green. This mid-size variety grows 4 to 5 feet tall and wide with a tight growth habit. Developed by Greenleaf Nursery Company as part of the Garden Debut® Collection.

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Lagerstroemia indica
Crapemyrtle (Mixed Colors)
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Double Dynamite'
Double Dynamite Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Double Dynamite' is a new variety from Dr. Carl Whitcomb. It would be notable simply for its vivid cherry-red flowers and deep purple foliage, but its ability to bloom continuously on the same panicle make it positively extraordinary. Enjoy over 100 days of bloom on a handsome, disease resistant plant.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite'
Dynamite Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite', developed by Dr. Carl Whitcomb, was the first true red tree-form crapemyrtle! Dynamite® crapemyrtle produces cherry red flowers on deep green foliage. New spring growth is reddish green. It is both drought and mildew resistant.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Pink Velour'
Pink Velour Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Pink Velour', developed by Dr. Carl Whitcomb, has deep pink long-lasting flowers. Deep wine red leaves emerge in spring and age to dark purplish green creating quite a contrast with bright flowers.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Red Rocket'
Red Rocket Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Red Rocket', developed by Dr. Carl Whitcomb, features brilliant cherry-red flowers with dark green foliage. It is one of the fastest growing crape myrtles reaching 4-6' in one season when cut to the ground in Kansas.

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Rhapsody in Pink'
Rhapsody in Pink Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Rhapsody in Pink' was developed by Dr. Carl Whitcomb. This upright growing shrub features light pink summer flowers appearing against handsome foliage, which emerges a purple hue that persists most of the season.

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Lamium 'Purple Dragon'
Purple Dragon Lamium / Deadnettle
$15.00 $19.50

>>>>>Ultra cold-hardy plants from northern climates normally dislike our long hot humid summers; although we are on the Southern edge of this plants adaptability, it still survives reasonably well here. Look for a cold microclimate planting location such as East or North exposure.>>>>>

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Lantana sp.
Mixed Lantana (Tropical)
$5.50 $7.15

***Description for this plant available with future update!***

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Lavandula angustifolia 'Munstead'
Violet-Blue Munstead Lavender

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia 'Munstead') is one of the most well-known flowers and herbal qualities. It features grayish green aromatic and evergreen foliage with lavender flowers. Blooming usually starts during the heat of summer and continues until frost. Lavender is native to Mediterranean climates with average moisture in the summer and dry, mild winters. Because of its heritage, it resents cold wet winters and needs well drained sandy, silty, or rocky soil. In the short term, it will typically grow in any soil during the summer making it very useful even as an annual. In Kansas landscapes, it is commonly used as an annual or short-lived perennial where lots of color is needed in full sun. Root rot is likely when placed in poor draining soil or even in rich garden soil. Summer heat is usually not a problem but not extreme heat of a south or west wall. Lavender does reasonably well growing out of retaining walls or on top of retaining walls with perfect drainage. Lavender is actually a woody shrub but grown like a in perennial because every so often do you need to trim it back to a few inches off the ground. Lavender combines nicely with any red, orange, or yellow flower or where needing a perennial with evergreen winter color. Lavandula angustifolia 'Munstead' is a commonly sold cultivar.

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Leptodermis oblonga
Purple Flowering Leptodermis
$15.00 $19.50

Purple Flowering Leptodermis, is also known as Leptodermis oblonga

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Lespedeza thunbergii 'Gibraltar'
Gibraltar Bush Clover
$15.00 $19.50

Gibraltar Bush Clover, is also known as Lespedeza thunbergii 'Gibraltar'

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Leucanthemum x superbaum 'Alaska'
Shasta Daisy

***Description for this perennial available with future update!***

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Liatris pycnostachya
Prairie Blazing Star / Liatris
$15.00 $19.50

Prairie Blazing Star / Liatris, is also known as Liatris pycnostachya

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Lilium 'Stargazer'
Stargazer Garden Lily
$25.00 $32.50

Stargazer Garden Lily, is also known as Lilium 'Stargazer'

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Lindera benzoin
Native Spicebush
$22.00 $28.60

Native Spicebush (Lindera benzoin) is a multi-stemmed, irregularly rounded understory shrub native to eastern North America, including Eastern Kansas. Foliage is a matte bright green then turning an attractive yellow in autumn. The yellow flowers grow in showy clusters appearing in early spring before foliage emerges. Flowers on male and female plants look noticeably different. The flowers have sepals in place of petals and a very sweet aroma. Red berries are produced if a male and female plant are close together. Nutritious fruit is quickly eaten by several bird species. Full shade to part shade is best with average to moisture-retentive rich soils. Height reaches 6-9’ tall in Kansas and Missouri. The name "Spicebush" comes from foliage and stems that are aromatic when bruised. Spicebush tolerates alkalinity, and in the wild is sometimes found in soils with exposed limestone. Some drought is tolerated if planted in shade; dry-shade experiments are in progress in Lawrence, KS. Use in the landscape as a wildlife friendly background shrub or grouping in shade gardens.

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Liriodendron tulipifera
Tuliptree
$90.00 $117.00

Tuliptree, is also known as Liriodendron tulipifera

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Liriope muscari 'Big Blue'
Big Blue Liriope
$15.00 $19.50

Big Blue Liriope (Liriope muscari 'Big Blue') grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover in medium to full shade. As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that can help conserve water and lower your water bill! Plantings can thrive for decades if in the right spot; there is no such thing as overcrowding for Liriope. When planted in mass, growth is slow at first but eventually a cake-like rhizome system will form and completely smother out any weeds and compete well with trees for water and nutrients. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. While Big Blue Liriope can tolerate full sun, they prefer part to full shade. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° and there are better plants to use in hot areas. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. In the winter, it will stay green until 0 degrees F and be completely evergreen some winters. Liriope also thrives in summer with the worst heat and humidity even in the Southeast and Southwest! Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species spreads slowly so you shouldn't leave very much room in-between Liriope plants or you will be waiting many years for the patch to fill in. Weeds can be a problem in that open area between plants if spacing is too wide. We recommend 12-18" spacing for a larger area. The only problem we have seen is a mysterious crown-rot disease in well-irrigated gardens. This liriope (Liriope muscari 'Big Blue') does not spread very quickly or much at all compared to Spreading Liriope / Monkey Grass (Liriope spicata) This is a real trooper for the dry shade garden!

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Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen'
Classic Blue Clump-forming Liriope-flat

Classic Blue Clump-forming Liriope (Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen') grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover in medium to full shade. As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that can help conserve water and lower your water bill! Plantings can thrive for decades if in the right spot; there is no such thing as overcrowding for Liriope. When planted in mass, growth is slow at first but eventually a cake-like rhizome system will form and completely smother out any weeds and compete well with trees for water and nutrients. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. While Big Blue Liriope can tolerate full sun, they prefer part to full shade. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° and there are better plants to use in hot areas. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. In the winter, it will stay green until 0 degrees F and be completely evergreen some winters. Liriope also thrives in summer with the worst heat and humidity even in the Southeast and Southwest! Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species spreads slowly so you shouldn't leave very much room in-between Liriope plants or you will be waiting many years for the patch to fill in. Weeds can be a problem in that open area between plants if spacing is too wide. We recommend 12-18" spacing for a larger area. The only problem we have seen is a mysterious crown-rot disease in well-irrigated gardens. This liriope (Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen') does not spread very quickly or much at all compared to Spreading Liriope / Monkey Grass (Liriope spicata) This is a real trooper for the dry shade garden!

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Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen'
Classic Blue Clump-forming Liriope
$5.00 $6.50

Classic Blue Clump-forming Liriope (Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen') grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover in medium to full shade. As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that can help conserve water and lower your water bill! Plantings can thrive for decades if in the right spot; there is no such thing as overcrowding for Liriope. When planted in mass, growth is slow at first but eventually a cake-like rhizome system will form and completely smother out any weeds and compete well with trees for water and nutrients. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. While Big Blue Liriope can tolerate full sun, they prefer part to full shade. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° and there are better plants to use in hot areas. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. In the winter, it will stay green until 0 degrees F and be completely evergreen some winters. Liriope also thrives in summer with the worst heat and humidity even in the Southeast and Southwest! Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species spreads slowly so you shouldn't leave very much room in-between Liriope plants or you will be waiting many years for the patch to fill in. Weeds can be a problem in that open area between plants if spacing is too wide. We recommend 12-18" spacing for a larger area. The only problem we have seen is a mysterious crown-rot disease in well-irrigated gardens. This liriope (Liriope muscari 'Classic Blue' / 'Ingwersen') does not spread very quickly or much at all compared to Spreading Liriope / Monkey Grass (Liriope spicata) This is a real trooper for the dry shade garden!

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Liriope muscari 'Variegata'
Variegated Liriope
$5.00 $6.50

Variegated Liriope (Liriope muscari 'Variegata') grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover in medium to full shade. As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that can help conserve water and lower your water bill! Plantings can thrive for decades if in the right spot; there is no such thing as overcrowding for Liriope. When planted in mass, growth is slow at first but eventually a cake-like rhizome system will form and completely smother out any weeds and compete well with trees for water and nutrients. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. While Big Blue Liriope can tolerate full sun, they prefer part to full shade. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° and there are better plants to use in hot areas. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. In the winter, it will stay green until 0 degrees F and be completely evergreen some winters. Liriope also thrives in summer with the worst heat and humidity even in the Southeast and Southwest! Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species spreads slowly so you shouldn't leave very much room in-between Liriope plants or you will be waiting many years for the patch to fill in. Weeds can be a problem in that open area between plants if spacing is too wide. We recommend 12-18" spacing for a larger area. The only problem we have seen is a mysterious crown-rot disease in well-irrigated gardens. This liriope (Liriope muscari 'Variegata') does not spread very quickly or much at all compared to Spreading Liriope / Monkey Grass (Liriope spicata) This is a real trooper for the dry shade garden!

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Liriope spicata
Spreading Liriope / Monkey Grass
$15.00 $19.50

Liriope (Liriope spitica) grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover / turf in medium to full shade. (also called “Lilyturf”). As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that cannot be disputed. A typical homeowner will save hundreds of dollars a year on lawn maintenance costs. Large turflike installations can save thousands of dollars per year. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. Liriope has a very low water requirement and a deep root system that allows it to draw water from a large area. Liriope thrives on only 1 deep watering per month in the summer to stay green. In the winter, it will stay green until zero degrees and be completely evergreen some winters. If the top Liriope grows to form a dense groundcover / turf in medium to full shade. Liriope requires no mowing maintenance (monthly mowing is optional to achieve 4” height) Un-mowed, it will grow uniformly 8-10” and appear like a lawn from a distance. Fewer weed problems occur; the dense growth of liriope grass smothers out existing weeds and prevents the germination of new seeds. The soft texture and medium green color are great assets; evergreen to 0ºF, survives -20. Liriope grows in zones 5-9; tolerates cold in the winter and heat / humidity in the summer. Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species is generally too aggressive to mix with other plants. Use as a groundcover or lawn substitute for dry-shade.

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Liriope spicata.
Dry Shade Liriope Lawn (bulk flats)
$110.00 $125.00

Liriope (Liriope spitica) grows to form a dense, dark green, grass-like groundcover / turf in medium to full shade. (also called “Lilyturf”). As one of the very best "dry-shade" plants, it has environmental and economic traits that cannot be disputed. A typical homeowner will save hundreds of dollars a year on lawn maintenance costs. Large turflike installations can save thousands of dollars per year. Even under the most hostile conditions such as huge silver maple and pin oak trees, liriope not only survives but thrives. Liriope has no insect or disease problems, will survive droughts, short-term floods and cold winters. Liriope has a very low water requirement and a deep root system that allows it to draw water from a large area. Liriope thrives on only 1 deep watering per month in the summer to stay green. In the winter, it will stay green until zero degrees and be completely evergreen some winters. If the top Liriope grows to form a dense groundcover / turf in medium to full shade. Liriope requires no mowing maintenance (monthly mowing is optional to achieve 4” height) Un-mowed, it will grow uniformly 8-10” and appear like a lawn from a distance. Fewer weed problems occur; the dense growth of liriope grass smothers out existing weeds and prevents the germination of new seeds. The soft texture and medium green color are great assets; evergreen to 0ºF, survives -20. Liriope grows in zones 5-9; tolerates cold in the winter and heat / humidity in the summer. Liriope is tolerant of a wide range of soil types but prefers clay/loam and will display best growth in fertile soils with average water but extremely drought tolerant in shaded areas! For the home garden, the species is generally too aggressive to mix with other plants. Use as a groundcover or lawn substitute for dry-shade.

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Lobelia cardinalis
Cardinal Flower / Native Lobilia
$15.00 $19.50

Cardinal Flower / Native Lobilia, is also known as Lobelia cardinalis

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Lonicera caerulea 'Yezberry'
Mixed Yezberry (Proven Winners Hybrids)

Also called Honeyberries, Japanese Haskap, or Yezberry® (Lonicera caerulea), these shrubs are easy-to-grow fruiting plants developed for their large, delicious blue fruit. Yezberry® are extremely cold hardy and able to bear fruit in zones 3-7. Plant with another Yezberry® variety for an abundant fruit set on both plants. However, as an ornamental shrub, late summer Kansas heat stress will likely cause partial to complete defoliation. This does not affect the fruit quality or overall health of the shrub as the flower buds for next year are already formed. Ultra cold-hardy plants from northern climates normally dislike our long hot humid summers; although we are on the Southern edge of this plants adaptability, it still survives reasonably well here. Look for a cold microclimate planting location such as East or North exposure. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Lonicera sempervirens
Coral Honeysuckle / American Honeysuckle
$22.00 $28.60

Coral Honeysuckle / American Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is native to eastern North America. It is a vine planted for its blue-green oval shaped foliage and gorgeous reddish/pink/orange flowers. American Honeysuckle is normally used in the landscape to cover trellises, pergolas, fences, and trees. Mature vines, when allowed to climb, flower and provide a valuable food source for hummingbirds, butterflies and other birds. Grow in rich, well drained soils in part shade or full sun. Sometimes foliage persists well into fall as it is a semi-evergreen plant in the South. Other times, foliage becomes too bedraggled to be effective if summers are too hot and humid causing powdery mildew and leaf spots to occur. After establishment, most vines can be high maintenance if it has already filled the space and you don't want it to spread any further so plan accordingly. It will climb trees if you allow it to naturalize, generally using it for support and not injuring it. The growth and foliage prefers to stay within the shade of canopy not covering over it. For the home garden, the species is a great native alternative to invasive Asian and Japanese honeysuckles.

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Lycium barbarum 'Red Zeppelin'
Red Zeppelin Gogi Berry / Edible Lifeberry

It's easy to grow your own goji berries! Though they seem like something exotic and tricky to grow, goji berries are durable, productive plants that can be grown without any special sprays, fertilizers, or even fussy pruning. Just plant them in full sun, stake them, and wait to reap a bounty of bright red fruits in autumn. Red Zeppelin® Goji Berry (Lycium barbarum 'Red Zeppelin') was selected especially for its very large fruit, which makes harvesting easier and more fun. A few things to note about growing goji berries: 1. they prefer an alkaline (higher pH) soil and don't grow well in acidic conditions. 2. goji has a natural habit of creating lots of thin, vine-like stems. To save space and make harvesting easier, we recommend that you put a very sturdy stake near the shrub after planting, then bundle the stems around the stake, tying with sturdy twine so that about one-quarter of the tops of the branches cascade downward, like a fountain. 3. Goji is generally a heavy feeder, and regular fertilizing is recommended. Apply a tomato or rose fertilizer in spring and again in early summer. The fruits are a bit bitter, like a green pepper, when they are fresh. To develop sweetness, they must be dried. If you don't have a dehydrator, spread ripe berries in a single layer on a piece of newspaper in a cool, bright spot with good air circulation. After about a week, they will feel leathery and can be stored in the fridge or freezer. Maintenance Notes: Does best in well-drained neutral to alkaline soils. At planting time, sink a 1x1" wood stake near the plant and bundle the canes around it. Let the tips of the stems cascade down, like a fountain. Each spring, move the tied point up further along the stake so that about one-quarter of the growth is above the tie. Then cut the branch tips back by 4-6". This encourages lateral branching, which is where most of the flowering and fruiting takes place. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Lycium barbarum 'Sweet Lifeberry'
Sweet Lifeberry Gogi Berry / Edible Lifeberry

Gogi berries (Lycium barbarum) have purple flowers in mid-summer develop into jewel-like red fruits that are bitter and tomato-like when fresh but turn sweet when set out to dry for a week or so. Very high yielding, especially in alkaline soils. Sweet Lifeberry Gogi Berry (Lycium barbarum 'Sweet Lifeberry') was selected for its extra-sweet fruit which makes for easier harvesting. Maintenance Notes: Does best in well-drained neutral to slightly alkaline soils. At planting time, sink a 1x1" wood stake near the plant and bundle the canes around it. Let the tips of the stems cascade down, like a fountain. Each spring, move the tied point up further along the stake so that about one-quarter of the growth is above the tie. Then cut the branch tips back by 4-6". This encourages lateral branching, which is where most of the flowering and fruiting takes place. Grow superfruit in your own backyard! Fruits become especially sweet when dried. Goji berries are easy to grow in full sun, although some staking is recommended for maximum access to the nutrient-rich fruit. A pollinator is not needed. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Lycoris squamigera
Pink Surprise Lily / Lycoris
$15.00 $19.50

>>>>>are typically grown for their mid-summer flowers and vertical iris-leaf foliage. The plants are temperate and subtropical herbaceous perennial bulbs native to areas with a summer wet season and dry winter. Gladiolus are hardy outside as a perennial when established and with minimal effort at least up to zone 6a. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and plant in full sun. Plant these bulbs in the ground at least 6-8" deep with 3-4" of mulch to enjoy a wonderful tropical flowering effect! Foliage may look bedwraggled by fall so it is ok to cut back foliage at that time. They can also be grown as a flowering summer patio plant. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter gladiolus is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few bulbs. If digging from the ground in colder zones, just save a big chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. In a customer's garden in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), four established specimens planted over 4-6" deep and mulched 2-3" with wood mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower.

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Lysimachia clethroides
White Gooseneck / Lysimachia
$15.00 $19.50

>>>>>For the home garden in rich well irrigated areas, this species can be too aggressive from self-seeding to mix with other plants. Use as a mass planting in poor un-irrigated soils only. However, in a difficult dry-shade garden, it will thrive, flower, and be relatively tame.>>>>>This plant can also be used as a marginal aquatic plant growing in shallow water. It can also grow as a bog plant needing constantly moist soil rich in organic matter. As a rain garden plant, it will thrive is a depressed area in the landscape that collects rain water from a roof during spring and summer periods of rain but then go dormant if the water hole dries out completely.

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Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea'
Gold Moneywort / Creeping Jenny
$10.00 $13.00

>>>>>This plant can also be used as a marginal aquatic plant growing in shallow water. It can also grow as a bog plant needing constantly moist soil rich in organic matter. As a rain garden plant, it will thrive is a depressed area in the landscape that collects rain water from a roof during spring and summer periods of rain but then go dormant if the water hole dries out completely.>>>>> Ultra cold-hardy plants from northern climates normally dislike our long hot humid summers; although we are on the Southern edge of this plants adaptability, it still survives reasonably well here. Look for a cold microclimate planting location such as East or North exposure.>>>>>

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Lythrum alatum
Native Purple Gooseneck / Lythrum alatum
$20.00 $26.00

>>>>>This plant can also be used as a marginal aquatic plant growing in shallow water. It can also grow as a bog plant needing constantly moist soil rich in organic matter. As a rain garden plant, it will thrive is a depressed area in the landscape that collects rain water from a roof during spring and summer periods of rain but then go dormant if the water hole dries out completely.

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