Plants

Search by Latin Name:

Showing 1 to 50 of 80 products

Sort By :

product product
Akebia quinata
Akebia / Chocolate Vine

Five leaf Akebia (Akebia quinata) is a twining vine with green leaves arranged in a palmate shape. Maroon to purple flowers have the slight aroma of chocolate and bloom early in the spring. As with most vines, they are not low maintenance due to their nature and purpose in life. Vines by nature are kind of like freeloaders that want to use other things (and other plants) for free support. This does not directly parasitize the tree but can add a lot of weight (storm damage) and shade out it’s foliage. It requires training to grow on some structures but will generally twine and try to grow to the highest point possible. When properly trained on a trellis or pergola, akebia can be amazing. It will grow in just about any soil and tolerate full shade to full sun. It may be used as a groundcover if nothing to climb on or an edible plant if you pollinate the flowers by hand. There are varieties available that when crossed, produce edible fruit. Akebia is invasive in some parts of the country but this is not the case in Kansas. Blooms occur in march or april very early when frosts are still occurring but with little damage to the plant. Foliage is persistent and semi evergreen until 10-15 degrees F.

product product
Amelanchier arborea
Juneberry / Missouri Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea) is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Missouri and surrounding northern states. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier arborea is also called Downy Serviceberry. Great plant for the edible landscape!

product product
Amelanchier canadensis
Juneberry / Canadian Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis) is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Eastern North America. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums or American plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier canadensis is also called Shadblow Serviceberry. Great plant for the edible landscape!

product product
Amelanchier laevis
Allegheny Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Eastern North America. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums or American plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier laevis reportedly has tastier (sweeter and juicier) berries. Great plant for the edible landscape!

product product
Amelanchier sp.
Mixed Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.) can be a shrub or dwarf tree form with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit, native to North America from Alaska across most of western Canada and in the western and north-central United States. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Great plant for the edible landscape!

product product
Aptenia / Mesembryanthemum cordifolia
Red Apple Ice Plant (Tropical)
$8.00 $10.40

Red Apple Ice Plant (Aptenia / Mesembryanthemum cordifolia) is grown in Kansas as an annual or potted patio plant. Brilliant green glossy leaves contrast magenta flowers all summer! Plant in full sun with dry to average soil. In moist soils, this plant will grow rapidly and bloom less which may be good or bad. Flowers love the sun, but close up at night and remain closed on cloudy days. Plants will flower right up to frost and survive until a hard freeze of 23 degrees F is reached. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, watch out for scale and mealybugs. To discourage these pests, allow to go partially dormant and keep in a near freezing garage all winter. Cut back any old foliage and stems and place outside in mid-spring in full sun. These pests are never have time to establish in 1 growing season and are rarely a problem when actively growing as an annual in your landscape. Botanical name has recently changed to Mesembryanthemum cordifolium. Also known as Baby Sun Rose or Heartleaf Ice Plant. A variegated form is also available.

product product
Aralia racemosa
American Spikenard / Aralia
$30.00 $39.00

American Spikenard (Aralia racemosa) matures to 3-5' in height and has green flowers with attractive reddish purple berries in early fall. Spikenard is a true herbaceous perennial in that it dies back each fall and emerges from the ground up each spring. So large and broad, it is sometimes confused for a woodland shrub. It prefers wet to medium soil but tolerated dry-shade when mature in rich clay soils. Many woodland plants have already finished flowering when Spikenard blooms and shows off its beautiful berries. Cut the entire plant down in fall as there is no winter interest. In Kansas landscapes, use in Woodland gardens, sun dappled shade gardens, naturalized areas, wild gardens and native plant gardens. Plant as a specimen focal point or small grouping backdrop for shorter plants to contract in the shade garden.

product product
Baptisia 'Burgundy Blast'
Burgundy Blast False Indigo
$15.00 $19.50

The False Indigo species (Baptisia) features beautiful compact bluish green leaves arranged in groups of three. Like many members in the legume family, they are nitrogen fixing plants which means they produce their own nitrogen in the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. The flowers bloom above the foliage normally in April and May. Common baptisia flower colors include white, purple, lavender, yellow, and pink as well as uncommon colors ranging from deep purple to maroon and even coppery orange. Considered a great North American native three season plant, the foliage always emerges very attractive followed by flowers that do not need deadheading. Foliage generally lasts pretty nice through hot summers and into fall turning black with first freeze. Seed pods also turn charcoal black when ripe and have considerable ornamental interest and useful in dried flower arrangements. At some point in the fall, it can be cut down early for a clean look or left for winter interest. Baptisia generally do well in droughty clay soils in full to part sun. There is only one pest that may create problems called the Genista Broom Moth. It may occur in Kansas when weather conditions are consistently dry and over 95 degrees F. It is treatable if you act fast but if not, it only destroys the foliage late in the season and does not kill the plant. Baptisia has several enormous spreading taproots which store water and energy and can make transplanting difficult. Plantings look good as specimen or in small groups; and it’s ok even preferable if they grow together and touch other plants. That helps eliminate available sunlight and discourages weeds. It is hard to picture a native plant garden or any perennial garden without Baptisia. Considered a once “it’s there, it’s always there” plant. >>>>>Baptisia 'Burgundy Blast' features dark wine purple flowers are produced over very dark blue-green foliage. When it is in bloom, it is a stunning display of color. This extremely long-lived perennial could be used instead of a shrub in landscape settings, with minimal care required to thrive year after year.

product product
Baptisia 'Cherries Jubilee'
Cherries Jubilee False Indigo
$15.00 $19.50

The False Indigo species (Baptisia) features beautiful compact bluish green leaves arranged in groups of three. Like many members in the legume family, they are nitrogen fixing plants which means they produce their own nitrogen in the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. The flowers bloom above the foliage normally in April and May. Common baptisia flower colors include white, purple, lavender, yellow, and pink as well as uncommon colors ranging from deep purple to maroon and even coppery orange. Considered a great North American native three season plant, the foliage always emerges very attractive followed by flowers that do not need deadheading. Foliage generally lasts pretty nice through hot summers and into fall turning black with first freeze. Seed pods also turn charcoal black when ripe and have considerable ornamental interest and useful in dried flower arrangements. At some point in the fall, it can be cut down early for a clean look or left for winter interest. Baptisia generally do well in droughty clay soils in full to part sun. There is only one pest that may create problems called the Genista Broom Moth. It may occur in Kansas when weather conditions are consistently dry and over 95 degrees F. It is treatable if you act fast but if not, it only destroys the foliage late in the season and does not kill the plant. Baptisia has several enormous spreading taproots which store water and energy and can make transplanting difficult. Plantings look good as specimen or in small groups; and it’s ok even preferable if they grow together and touch other plants. That helps eliminate available sunlight and discourages weeds. It is hard to picture a native plant garden or any perennial garden without Baptisia. Considered a once “it’s there, it’s always there” long lived plant. >>>>>Baptisia 'Cherries Jubilee' features deep maroon buds open to bicolor maroon and yellow flowers held on strong scapes above the blue-green foliage in late spring to early summer. Secondary branching on the flower stems makes this variety especially floriferous. As the flowers age, they turn gold creating the bi-color effect! This extremely long-lived perennial could be used instead of a shrub in landscape settings, with minimal care required to thrive year after year.>>>>>This plant is a member of the DECADENCE® series from Walters Gardens, Inc.

product product
Baptisia x variicolor 'Twilite Prairieblues'
Twilite Prairieblues False Indigo
$15.00 $19.50

The False Indigo (Baptisia species) features beautiful compact bluish green leaves arranged in groups of three. Like many members in the legume family, they are nitrogen fixing plants which means they produce their own nitrogen in the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. The flowers bloom above the foliage normally in April and May. Common baptisia flower colors include white, purple, lavender, yellow, and pink as well as uncommon colors ranging from deep purple to maroon and even coppery orange. Considered a great North American native three season plant, the foliage always emerges very attractive followed by flowers that do not need deadheading. Foliage generally lasts pretty nice through hot summers and into fall turning black with first freeze. Seed pods also turn charcoal black when ripe and have considerable ornamental interest and useful in dried flower arrangements. At some point in the fall, it can be cut down early for a clean look or left for winter interest. Baptisia generally do well in droughty clay soils in full to part sun. There is only one pest that may create problems called the Genista Broom Moth. It may occur in Kansas when weather conditions are consistently dry and over 95 degrees F. It is treatable if you act fast but if not, it only destroys the foliage late in the season and does not kill the plant. Baptisia has several enormous spreading taproots which store water and energy and can make transplanting difficult. Plantings look good as specimen or in small groups; and it’s ok even preferable if they grow together and touch other plants. That helps eliminate available sunlight and discourages weeds. It is hard to picture a native plant garden or any perennial garden without Baptisia. Considered a once “it’s there, it’s always there” long lived plant. Baptisia x variicolor 'Twilite Prairieblues' is a cross between B. australis, a blue flowering variety, and B. sphaerocarpa, a yellow flowering variety. The result is pea-like violet-purple and maroon flowers with dramatic yellow keels and foliage that is more on the blue-green spectrum. In Kansas we have noticed a slightly increased incidence of Genista Broom Moth with this cultivar, but overall vigorousness offsets any permanent damage to the plant. This extremely long-lived perennial could be used instead of a shrub in landscape settings, with minimal care required to thrive year after year.

product product
Bletilla striata
Hardy Ground Orchid
$20.00 $26.00

Hardy Ground Orchid (Bletilla striata) is planted for its attractive green foliage with and amazing spring flower display of pink and magenta "orchid-like" flowers. Foliage maintains well all season provided that certain cultural conditions are met. Native to Chinese forests with humusy, well-drained soil in part shade to full shade, it needs constantly moist to average soil rich in organic matter but avoid clay. If low temperatures hit -10 degrees F, it may kill an un-mulched plant; protect any zone 6 perennial with thick layer of mulch. I have occasionally seen entire plantings wiped out at -10 to15 degrees F with no mulch or snow cover. Good late summer flowering shade plant which mixes well with hostas and ferns in the shade garden. Generally this plant has declined after a few years in our Kansas display garden but worth a try in perfect soils in well-tended shade gardens.

product product
Bletilla striata 'Big Bob'
Big Bob Hardy Ground Orchid
$20.00 $26.00

Hardy Ground Orchid (Bletilla striata) is planted for its attractive green foliage with and amazing spring flower display of pink and magenta "orchid-like" flowers. Foliage maintains well all season provided that certain cultural conditions are met. Native to Chinese forests with humusy, well-drained soil in part shade to full shade, it needs constantly moist to average soil rich in organic matter but avoid clay. If low temperatures hit -10 degrees F, it may kill an un-mulched plant; protect any zone 6 perennial with thick layer of mulch. I have occasionally seen entire plantings wiped out at -10 to 15 degrees F with no mulch or snow cover. Good late summer flowering shade plant which mixes well with hostas and ferns in the shade garden. Big Bob Hardy Ground Orchid (Bletilla striata 'Big Bob') has taller foliage upto 3' and bigger flowers. Our trail plant was originally purchased at Bustani Plant Farm in Stillwater, Oklahoma,

product product
Buddleia 'Dark Dynasty'
Dark Dynasty Butterfly Bush
$18.00 $23.40

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia) are workhorses in the pollinator garden. Flower panicles come in a variety of colors mostly including shades of lavender, magenta, violet, pink, and white. Most Butterfly Bushes bloom on new wood so trimming off winter kill or complete rejuvenation will not affect flowering. In fact, flowering is often bigger and bolder from new water sprout growth when trimmed to the ground each year. Most Butterfly Bushes in zone 6 are maintained this way. Foliage is typically an attractive greenish-gray to mint green and persists into the fall until hard freezes occur. Use in the landscape in small or large groupings for its amazing flower power! Plants grow best in full sun with medium to dry soils. Drought tolerance is high with established plants so extra watering is rarely needed in our East Kansas climate with 40 inches of rain per year. Obviously, Butterfly Bush attracts lots of butterflies. There has been some debate in recent years on whether to plant Butterfly Bush because it’s a non-native plant. Being a native of China, it has no pest or disease problems here. It is invasive in some parts of the country but cold Kansas winters keep it and check and without any self-seeding problems here. If you are still worried about it, there are several sterile varieties to choose from. There have been many drastically improved cultivars in the last 10 years aiming to improve cold hardiness, bloom size, eliminate seeding, and improve growth habits. Buddleia 'Dark Dynasty' is a compact new Buddleia fits easily into urban gardens with its densely compact, rounded habit. It is a new addition to the popular MONARCH® Butterfly Bush collection! Unlike some other dwarf Buddleias that become very wide spreading, ‘Dark Dynasty’ keeps its composure as it ages, growing just 3’ tall and 3 ½’ wide in two years. Rich royal purple, fragrant flowers are borne on branched panicles from late summer into early fall, just in time to feed the migrating monarchs passing through. In Eastern Kansas, 'Dark Dynasty' has performs WELL for over 3 years with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Combine with caryopteris and crapemyrtle to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators! The MONARCH® trademark is owned by Walters Gardens, Inc.

product product
Buddleia 'Queen of Hearts'
Queen of Hearts Magenta Butterfly Bush
$18.00 $23.40

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia) are workhorses in the pollinator garden. Flower panicles come in a variety of colors mostly including shades of lavender, magenta, violet, pink, and white. Most Butterfly Bushes bloom on new wood so trimming off winter kill or complete rejuvenation will not affect flowering. In fact, flowering is often bigger and bolder from new water sprout growth when trimmed to the ground each year. Most Butterfly Bushes in zone 6 are maintained this way. Foliage is typically an attractive greenish-gray to mint green and persists into the fall until hard freezes occur. Use in the landscape in small or large groupings for its amazing flower power! Plants grow best in full sun with medium to dry soils. Drought tolerance is high with established plants so extra watering is rarely needed in our East Kansas climate with 40 inches of rain per year. Obviously, Butterfly Bush attracts lots of butterflies. There has been some debate in recent years on whether to plant Butterfly Bush because it’s a non-native plant. Being a native of China, it has no pest or disease problems here. It is invasive in some parts of the country but cold Kansas winters keep it and check and without any self-seeding problems here. If you are still worried about it, there are several sterile varieties to choose from. There have been many drastically improved cultivars in the last 10 years aiming to improve cold hardiness, bloom size, eliminate seeding, and improve growth habits. Buddleia 'Queen of Hearts' is a compact new Buddleia fits easily into urban gardens with its densely compact, rounded habit. It is a new addition to the popular MONARCH® Butterfly Bush collection! The vibrant magenta red flowers of this new selection are sure to capture the hearts of gardeners everywhere, and the butterflies and hummingbirds will love them too! Large 7-9” long panicles are produced from the top of the plant to the bottom, pointing upward and outward on all sides in late summer and early fall. Smaller secondary flowers extend the show. In Eastern Kansas, 'Queen of Hearts' has performs WELL for over 3 years with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Combine with caryopteris and crapemyrtle to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators! The MONARCH® trademark is owned by Walters Gardens, Inc.

product product
Buddleia x 'Miss Molly'
Miss Molly Magenta Butterfly Bush

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia) are workhorses in the pollinator garden. Flower panicles come in a variety of colors mostly including shades of lavender, magenta, violet, pink, and white. Most Butterfly Bushes bloom on new wood so trimming off winter kill or complete rejuvenation will not affect flowering. In fact, flowering is often bigger and bolder from new water sprout growth when trimmed to the ground each year. Most Butterfly Bushes in zone 6 are maintained this way. Foliage is typically an attractive greenish-gray to mint green and persists into the fall until hard freezes occur. Use in the landscape in small or large groupings for its amazing flower power! Plants grow best in full sun with medium to dry soils. Drought tolerance is high with established plants so extra watering is rarely needed in our East Kansas climate with 40 inches of rain per year. Obviously, Butterfly Bush attracts lots of butterflies. There has been some debate in recent years on whether to plant Butterfly Bush because it’s a non-native plant. Being a native of China, it has no pest or disease problems here. It is invasive in some parts of the country but cold Kansas winters keep it and check and without any self-seeding problems here. If you are still worried about it, there are several sterile varieties to choose from. There have been many drastically improved cultivars in the last 10 years aiming to improve cold hardiness, bloom size, eliminate seeding, and improve growth habits. Buddleia x 'Miss Molly' is a Proven Winners® plant With its intensely colored blooms and refined habit, 'Miss Molly' is the queen of the summer garden. Its fragrant flowers are the closest to red of any Butterfly Bush and appear for months every summer without deadheading. Unlike older varieties of Butterfly Bush, 'Miss Molly' reaches just 4-5' tall, so it's easy to work into any sunny landscape. This non-invasive variety thrives in hot climates. Butterflies and hummingbirds will find it as irresistible as you do! In Eastern Kansas, 'Miss Molly' has performs WELL for over 10 years with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated. Cold tolerance is no problem in our zone 6. If winter die-back occurs, cut back in March/April and flowers will occur on new growth in summer. No disease or pest problems. Combine with caryopteris and crapemyrtle to create a late season "all you can eat" buffet for pollinators! All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Callicarpa americana
American Beautyberry
$18.00 $23.40

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), native to Southeast US including Oklahoma and Missouri, is one of the most unique and attractive shrubs for berry production. Considered a three-season shrub, green foliage emerges in spring with attractive clusters of tiny pink flowers in summer. Big conglomerates of fruit clusters occur along the stem at evenly spaced intervals. Bright purple in color, the fruit is very effective through the month of October and November in our Zone 6a Kansas climate. Fall foliage is bright yellow often contrasting with the purple berries in November. By the following spring, winter kill to the ground will almost always occur as temperatures regularly drop to 0 degrees F or below. Cut to a few inches off the ground as you would with a perennial. You may choose to do this rejuvenation anyways in Southern areas if it has not been done in a few years to increase fruit production on vigorous new growth. New shoots create fountain-shaped shrub 3-4’ after rejuvenation. Flowering occurs on new wood so you will always have berries when using this method. Purple berry clusters are highly ornamental and eaten only very slowly (never stripped clean) by birds. In southern parts of its range, full to part shade is best. However, full to part sun is recommended in zone 6 to maximize energy production needed from the sun in a shorter growing season. Mild drought is tolerated at the expense of dropping fruits if it gets too dry. Our plants in the display garden survived the winter of 2021 with temperatures reaching -16 degrees F coming up reliably from the ground each year. Overall, this is a great "woody perennial" for the Kansas landscape that is unfortunately often underused.

product product
Callirhoe bushii
Upright Bush Poppy Mallow / Winecups
$13.00 $16.90

Upright Winecups (Callirhoe bushii) is also called Bush's Poppy Mallow. This plant grows from a carrot like taproot sporting a cluster of semi evergreen foliage around the base. In spring, new upright and prostrate growing vines spread in all directions along the ground up to 3 to 4 feet away from the taproot but do not root along the way. By late May or early June, magenta red “wine cup” shaped flowers cover this plant. The show last for about 4 to 6 weeks or until severe summer drought sets in. Usually in July, the flowering is complete and will set seed if allowed. Foliage will look bedraggled enough to justify complete cut back. This may be a good time to mulch unless you already mulched during the spring. When cooler weather returns in the fall, new growth emerges from the taproot looking attractive again. Secondary flowering may also occur in early fall….especially on summer planted plants. Bush's Poppy Mallow is a rare native wildflower of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and Oklahoma in rocky open woods and ravine bottoms. Bush's Poppy Mallow appreciates well drained soil and full to part sun. However we have found that it will still bloom and tolerate almost full shade (just a couple hours) if needed and our 40 inches of rain per year. A great plant for the top of a retaining wall, native pollinator gardens, or to even among other perennials to provide texture and contrast. It’s one Achilles’ heel is rabbits. Rabbits are usually only a problem in crowded suburbs where they have a little wild vegetation to eat and no predators. Gardeners with lots of established plants usually do not have rabbit problems. If rabbits are a problem for you, and you still want to grow upright wine cups, cover the plant with a bowl shaped piece of chicken wire attached with weed barrier pins. This will allow the taproot and basil foliage to get established the first year without any browsing (flowers may get eaten); after removing the cage the second year, the plants will generally outgrow any rabbit browsing. Other problems could be root rot but I have generally not seen that even in clay soils in Lawrence Kansas. Self seeding should be allowed to gently occur around the base of the plant to ensure a thick groundcover; these plants tolerate crowded conditions and will not crowd each other out or need division. This is one of the most iconic and beautiful native wildflowers!

product product
Callirhoe involucrata
Magenta Poppy Mallow / Winecups
$10.00 $13.00

Wine cup (Callirhoe involucrata) is also called purple poppy mallow. This plant grows from a carrot like taproot sporting a cluster of semi evergreen foliage around the base. In spring, new prostrate growing vines spread in all directions along the ground up to 3 to 4 feet away from the taproot but do not root along the way. By late May or early June, magenta red “wine cup” shaped flowers cover this plant. The show last for about 4 to 6 weeks or until severe summer drought sets in. Usually in July, the flowering is complete and will set seed if allowed. Foliage will look bedraggled enough to justify complete cut back. This may be a good time to mulch unless you already mulched during the spring. When cooler weather returns in the fall, new growth emerges from the taproot looking attractive again. Secondary flowering may also occur in early fall….especially on summer planted plants. Poppy mallow winecup is a native plant of the great plains south to Texas and includes most of Kansas. As with most plants native to prairie areas, winecup appreciates well drained soil and full sun. However we have found that it will tolerate almost full shade if needed and our 40 inches of rain per year. A great plant for the top of a retaining wall, native pollinator gardens, or to even among other perennials to provide texture and contrast. It’s one Achilles’ heel is rabbits. Rabbits are usually only a problem in crowded suburbs where they have a little wild vegetation to eat and no predators. Gardeners with lots of established plants usually do not have rabbit problems. If rabbits are a problem for you, and you still want to grow wine cups, cover the plant with a bowl shaped piece of chicken wire attached with weed barrier pins. This will allow the taproot and basil foliage to get established the first year without any browsing; after removing the cage the second year, the plants will generally outgrow any rabbit browsing. Other problems could be root rot but I have generally not seen that even in clay soils in Lawrence Kansas. Self seeding should be allowed to gently occur around the base of the plant to ensure a thick groundcover; these plants tolerate crowded conditions and will not crowd each other out or need division. This is one of the most iconic and beautiful native wildflowers!

product product
Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite'
Aphrodite Sweetshrub / Calycanthus
$8.00 $10.40

Aphrodite Sweetshrub (Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite') is covered in big, glossy, medium-green leaves. This shrub explodes with enormous cupped flowers that look a bit like a deep red magnolia. They start in early summer with a big flush of flowers continuing to bloom sporadically all summer long. This is a quite large shrub that needs plenty of space to look its best, but if you have the room for it, there are few better ways to use it! 'Aphrodite' is a hybrid between our native Calycanthus and the Asian species, x Sinocalycanthus. You're probably wondering if it's fragrant, and the answer is - it depends. The scent varies based on the age of the bloom, the time of day, and the flower itself. Some people say they smell like pineapple, others apples, others bubblegum, and some get no scent at all. Even if you never sense a whiff off this plant, its fabulous flowers are more than enough reward. Prune after flowering to maintain shape. This Calycanthus performs amazingly well in eastern Kansas landscapes. It is great along a woodland edge or in morning sun. When planted in full shade with rich soil in our Lawrence, KS Zone 6a display garden, growth is very rapid and flowers completely cover the shrub for a few weeks in early summer. Yes, you heard right, this shrub is will flower in full shade. It tolerates a wide variety of soil types including clay but needs prefers well-drained soil high in organic matter. Adaptable to mild drought and heat (plant in full shade in southern zones) but greatly improved with rich, moisture-retentive soils. Typically, our 40 inches of rainfall per year in Eastern Kansas is sufficient. Summer foliage is virtually pest-free. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Celosia argentea var. spicata 'Flamingo Feather'
Flamingo Feather Celosia (Tropical)
$8.00 $10.40

Flamingo Feather Celosia (Celosia argentea var. spicata 'Flamingo Feather') is a large magenta flowering annual. Growth starts off in May when temperatures have warmed. Beautiful dark green foliage has reddish colored back sides of the leaf and magenta stems. After achieving about 3 to 4 feet in height and wide, fuzzy magenta flower spikes begin to appear usually by July. Ultimate height can reach 5-6 feet as flowering becomes more dense and continues until frost providing an excellent long-lasting show. Celosia has little winter interests so you may cut down promptly after the first fall freeze. This is a time to save some of the seeds if you wish to sprinkle them in a new area next year. You may or may not enjoy the fact that the Celosia will easily re-seed itself in areas that you do not mulch. Seedlings come up rather late and can create a carpet under the previous years planting location. We usually allow self-seeding to occur in our display garden in select areas and then spray Roundup or mulch wherever you do not want seedlings. Flamingo Feather Celosia needs full sun for best flowering but tolerated virtually any soil conditions including compacted driveway gravel. Use Flamingo Feather Celosia where you need to fill up a lot of space in a hurry or just like lots of magenta flowers in the fall when other things are not blooming. Celosia is also grown as a food crop in Africa and Southeast Asia.

product product
Cercis canadensis
Eastern Redbud
$40.00 $52.00

Eastern Redbud, is also known as Cercis canadensis

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Burgandy Hearts'
Burgandy Hearts Purple-Leaf Redbud

Cercis canadensis Burgundy Hearts® is an improved reddish purple-leaf variety developed by Greenleaf Nurseries in Oklahoma. Burgundy Hearts more drought and heat tolerant. Pinkish-lavender April flowers bloom for about a month before leaves appear. It has a more or less rounded form, wider than it is tall. This small deciduous tree is known for its heart-shaped leaves that hold their dark color longer in the summer, taking on reddish wine tones towards the fall. Many of the problems with the regular species redbud tree are not an issue with this improved cultivar. It is to be expected however that all Redbuds have a relatively short lifespan of 20-40 years but even so, are worth planting for its beautiful flowers. It is not weak wooded and makes a nice hot non-sparking firewood. The short life span is not due to breakage so much as it is to the tree's susceptibility to heart-rot especially when branch crotches form and get older. Other problems include canker, verticillium wilt and root rot. Most redbud varieties thrive in full sun to partial shade. They will tolerate full shade but become elongated and thin as they reach for the sun. Redbuds do well in most soil types but adequate drainage is a must; it can tolerate dry shade of Eastern Kansas forests receiving at least 35" of rainfall per year. The species is a native from southern Canada to Florida, east to Kansas. The regular species also has the potential to self seed in your yard but not Burgundy Hearts. As a dwarf tree, use ‘Merlot’ as a specimen or part of a group. It reaches about 20 to 30 feet high and wide in full sun. Reddish leaf color emerges in the spring and is maintained all summer long if in mostly full sun. The color of older purple redbuds (like Forest Pansy) fades to dark green as the summer heat intensifies.

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Don Egolf'
Don Egolf Redbud
$15.00 $19.50

Don Egolf Redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Don Egolf') is a dwarf flowering shrub redbud native to China. It has the typical heart shaped green Redbud foliage and deep magenta flowers. The bark is more of a beige or light tan color with black buds. Flowering begins in April with flower buds starting on old wood all the way to the ground level. Flowering even occurs on very young plants only several inches tall. Because this is a Chinese species, no seed pods form like on native Redbuds. After many years, heights of 8 to 10 feet may be achieved on multi-stemmed plants. Culture conditions are pretty easy; just provide average garden soil, reasonable water, and mostly sun. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water if planted in good soils. Don Eagles Red has been growing in our display garden for over 10 years blooming consistently with no problems. It survived -16 degrees F and a week of single digit highs in February, 2021 with no damage to flower buds.

product product
Cercis canadensis 'Merlot'
Merlot Purple-Leaf Redbud

This purple-leaf Redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Merlot') is a canadensis and texensis cross to produce a more drought and heat tolerant tree. It has glossy, small rounded dark purple leaves and has an upright vase-shaped growth habit. This small deciduous tree is known for its stunning display of colorful blooms a deep magenta color. Many of the problems with the regular species redbud tree are not an issue with this improved cultivar. It is to be expected however that all Redbuds have a relatively short lifespan of 20-40 years but even so, are worth planting for its beautiful flowers. It is not weak wooded and makes a nice hot non-sparking firewood. The short life span is not due to breakage so much as it is to the tree's susceptibility to heart-rot especially when branch crotches form and get older. Other problems include canker, verticillium wilt and root rot. Most redbud varieties thrive in full sun to partial shade. They will tolerate full shade but become elongated and thin as they reach for the sun. Redbuds do well in most soil types but adequate drainage is a must; it can tolerate dry shade of Eastern Kansas forests receiving at least 35" of rainfall per year. The species is a native from southern Canada to Florida, east to Kansas. The regular species also has the potential to self seed in your yard but not 'Merlot'. As a dwarf tree, use ‘Merlot’ as a specimen or part of a group. It reaches about 12 to 15 feet high and wide in full sun. Reddish leaf color emerges in the spring and is maintained all summer long if in mostly full sun. The color of older purple redbuds (like Forest Pansy) fades to dark green as the summer heat intensifies.

product product
Chilopsis linearis 'Bubba'
Bubba Magenta Desert Willow
$45.00 $58.50

Desert Willow is a small open irregularly branched tree or large shrub with bright green narrow leaves (but not related to true willows) It features gorgeous pink, white and magenta snapdragon-like flowers with yellow throats. Blooming season is immensely long beginning in June continuing all summer until frost. Desert Willow grows in all soil types here in Kansas but prefers rich silty loam. It will not grow in excessively wet anaerobic soils though. Absolute full sun is needed for best growth to produce flowers and avoid spindlyness. In the landscape, Desert Willow can be used as a specimen shrub or small tree. It handles hot west for south locations very well. It’s native range covers most of the Southwest and western Texas along streams and riparian areas. Being surprisingly cold hardy here, Several Desert Willow cultivars can be found at the Denver Botanic Gardens in Denver CO (zone 5b) and at the Dyck Arboretum in Hesston, Kansas (zone 6b). Bubba Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis 'Bubba') has been thriving in our display garden and other Lawrence, KS locations for over 15 years and has endured temperatures as low as a -18. During the most severe winters, winter kills it down to the ground. However, just like Crapemyrtle or Butterfly Bush, Desert Willow blooms on new wood and at a young age with blooms even occurring on 3 foot tall nursery plants. Water sprout regrowth from established landscape plants is rapid with heights reaching 5-6'. These blooms are more numerous and larger than normal, especially with a handful of time-release fertilized applied in the early spring. Bubba Magenta Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis 'Bubba') is a vigorous, fast-growing upright selection of desert willow that originated in Texas. Compared to other selections it has a strong vertical form and is less shrubby. It also has glossy, darker green, more lush foliage than other desert willows.

product product
Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet'
Ellen Bosanquet Red Hardy Crinum Lily
$40.00 $52.00

Crinums are tough, long-lived perennial bulbs with strappy leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. In areas where the bulbs are hardy, (zones 5/6-10) these plants can reach as much as 4 feet across and bloom all summer. Crinums can live for 200-300 years in the South often found growing in cemeteries and abandoned home sites with little or no attention. The plants are native to southeast Asia often in areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can also be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is easy to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas with mulch or no mulch! The trick is to plant them deep: an extra 4-6" deeper than grade or with neck of bulb completely buried. Crinums are extremely adaptable thriving in either in dry or in boggy soils. Crinums are tough, low maintenance bulbs which make them perfect for rain gardens, and although drought-tolerant, crinums bloom more if well-watered. This plant can also grow in standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Unlike southern climates, crinums in Kansas need full sun to grow and flower in our shorter growing season. Crinum are more cold hardy than most authorities publish; easily pushing into zone 5 for some varieties. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Crinum 'Infusion', Crinum tweedianum, Crinum 'Super Ellen', Crinum x powellii, Crinum 'White Prince') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. No crinums were lost or harmed during this event! Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet' has dark magenta/red flowers 24" tall

product product
Crinum 'Infusion'
Infusion Magenta Hardy Crinum Lily
$40.00 $52.00

Crinums are tough, long-lived perennial bulbs with strappy leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. In areas where the bulbs are hardy, (zones 5/6-10) these plants can reach as much as 4 feet across and bloom all summer. Crinums can live for 200-300 years in the South often found growing in cemeteries and abandoned home sites with little or no attention. The plants are native to southeast Asia often in areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can also be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is easy to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas with mulch or no mulch! The trick is to plant them deep: an extra 4-6" deeper than grade or with neck of bulb completely buried. Crinums are extremely adaptable thriving in either in dry or in boggy soils. Crinums are tough, low maintenance bulbs which make them perfect for rain gardens, and although drought-tolerant, crinums bloom more if well-watered. This plant can also grow in standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Unlike southern climates, crinums in Kansas need full sun to grow and flower in our shorter growing season. Crinum are more cold hardy than most authorities publish; easily pushing into zone 5 for some varieties. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Crinum 'Infusion', Crinum tweedianum, Crinum 'Super Ellen', Crinum x powellii, Crinum 'White Prince') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. No crinums were lost or harmed during this event! Crinum 'Infusion' is a large crinum up to 48" tall with magenta flowers. Offsets heavily. Hardy to Zone 5b.

product product
Crinum 'Super Ellen'
Super Ellen Magenta Hardy Crinum Lily
$40.00 $52.00

Crinums are tough, long-lived perennial bulbs with strappy leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. In areas where the bulbs are hardy, (zones 5/6-10) these plants can reach as much as 4 feet across and bloom all summer. Crinums can live for 200-300 years in the South often found growing in cemeteries and abandoned home sites with little or no attention. The plants are native to southeast Asia often in areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can also be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is easy to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas with mulch or no mulch! The trick is to plant them deep: an extra 4-6" deeper than grade or with neck of bulb completely buried. Crinums are extremely adaptable thriving in either in dry or in boggy soils. Crinums are tough, low maintenance bulbs which make them perfect for rain gardens, and although drought-tolerant, crinums bloom more if well-watered. This plant can also grow in standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Unlike southern climates, crinums in Kansas need full sun to grow and flower in our shorter growing season. Crinum are more cold hardy than most authorities publish; easily pushing into zone 5 for some varieties. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Crinum 'Infusion', Crinum tweeedianum, Crinum 'Super Ellen', Crinum x powellii, Crinum 'White Prince') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. No crinums were lost or harmed during this event! Crinum 'Super Ellen' is a massive crinum (cross of Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet' x Crinum bulbispermum) up to 60" tall with magenta flowers. Offsets heavily.

product product
Crinum sp.
Crinum Lily (assorted)
$40.00 $52.00

Crinums are tough, long-lived perennial bulbs with strappy leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. In areas where the bulbs are hardy, (zones 5/6-10) these plants can reach as much as 4 feet across and bloom all summer. Crinums can live for 200-300 years in the South often found growing in cemeteries and abandoned home sites with little or no attention. The plants are native to southeast Asia often in areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can also be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is easy to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas with mulch or no mulch! The trick is to plant them deep: an extra 4-6" deeper than grade or with neck of bulb completely buried. Crinums are extremely adaptable thriving in either in dry or in boggy soils. Crinums are tough, low maintenance bulbs which make them perfect for rain gardens, and although drought-tolerant, crinums bloom more if well-watered. This plant can also grow in standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Unlike southern climates, crinums in Kansas need full sun to grow and flower in our shorter growing season. Crinum are more cold hardy than most authorities publish; easily pushing into zone 5 for some varieties. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Crinum 'Infusion', Crinum tweedianum, Crinum 'Super Ellen', Crinum x powellii, Crinum 'White Prince') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. No crinums were lost or harmed during this event!

product product
Dalea purpureum
Great Plains Magenta Bush Clover
$10.00 $13.00

Great Plains Magenta Bush Clover, is also known as Dalea purpureum

product product
Dalea purpureum 'Stephanie'
Great Plains Magenta Bush Clover
$10.00 $13.00

Great Plains Magenta Bush Clover, is also known as Dalea purpureum 'Stephanie'

product product
Echinacea purpurea 'Ruby Star' / 'Rubinstern'
Ruby Star Coneflower
$15.00 $19.50

>>>>>Echinacea purpurea is an herbaceous perennial native to parts of eastern and midwestern United States most common in Missouri and Arkansas. Its habitats include dry open woods, prairies and barrens. Echinacea are native to North America, featuring sunflower-like flowers with a dark center and colorful petals. Colors on native plants include purple, magenta, white, yellow. Intensive breeding efforts to fish out recessive genes have brought bright orange and red into the picture. Flowers occur in early to mid summer often continuing into fall especially if dead-headed. Its individual flowers (florets) within the flower head are two-toned, having both male and female organs in each flower. (hermaphroditic) Bees and butterflies including the monarch are common pollinators. The dead flowers are attractive to some for winter interest but for those wanting a tidy your garden, they can be trimmed early. Leaving some dried seed heads will be beneficial for wildlife and provide winter food for finches and other birds. Best growth generally occurs in full to part sun with well drained soils with low to average moisture. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water. Coneflower can also handle short one to two day flooding events and are sometimes used along the higher perimeter of rain gardens to bring in pollinators. Coneflower mixes well with many other types of plants ranging from other native plants to evergreens to hardy tropicals. Rabbits can be a problem young immature plants. A popular method of control is covering the plant with an upside down bowl-shaped chicken wire cage for the first year to allow basil foliage to establish well. You can quickly make these yourself with a low cost roll of chicken wire. Mature plants especially in groups with other mature landscaping generally do not have rabbit problems. Flowers are also popular in the florist industry as cut flowers or in the cottage garden. The genus echinacea has undergone intense breeding with the introduction of hundreds of new cultivars in the last 10 years. Sunset Coneflower / Red-Orange Coneflower (Echinacea x Sunset) features red-orange and pinkish flowers. Most orange or red types if allowed to self-seed will produce purple flowering plants.

product product
Epimedium 'Domino'
Domino Barrenwort / Epimedium
$10.00 $11.00

Barrenwort (Epimedium) features compact dainty mounds of green to colored weed-resistant foliage. Wispy flowers appear above emerging foliage in mid-spring. Improved breeding has resulted in many different flower colors even including orange. Semi-evergreen foliage can sometimes look bedraggled by late summer if there is too much overhead watering and humidity. Barrenwort prefers average to dry garden conditions and even thrive and dry shade. Plantings can thrive for decades if in the right spot; there is no such thing as overcrowding for Barrenwort. When planted in mass, growth is slow at first but eventually a cake-like rhizome system will form and completely smother out any weeds and compete well with trees for water and nutrients. While barrenwort can tolerate full sun, they prefer part to full shade. Sun burning is possible with temperatures over 100° and there are better plants to use in hot areas. Due to slow spreading growth, you shouldn't leave very much room in-between barrenwort plants or you will be waiting many years for the patch to fill in. Weeds can be a problem in that open area between plants if spacing is too wide. We recommend 9-12" spacing and use for small nooks in the shade garden. If planning for a larger area, still figure on the tight spacing but allow for a higher budget that you will consider a permanent investment. Barrenwort is a real trooper for the dry shade garden! Epimedium 'Domino' features airy, delicate-looking flowers that have flowers with white spurs and pink centers and evergreen leaves are mottled green with dark burgundy. Flowers are produced along the length of the flower stems, which are up to 24" long. This is a vigorous Epimedium that produces up to 100 flower stems on a 4-year-old plant, according to Plant Delight's Tony Avent. Growth is faster and height is taller at 12-24" Albeit still slow compared to other perennials.

product product
Euonymus carnosus
Spindletree

***Tree descriptions available with future update!***

product product
Ficus carica 'Chicago Hardy'
Chicago Hardy Fig (large)
$75.00 $97.50

The common fig (Ficus carica) is native to an area extending from Asiatic Turkey to northern India. In Kansas, plant in a protected area near the house on south or west side but will survive in other locations in full hot sun. As an edible, ornamental plant, figs are an attractive bush-like plant with sandpapery green sometimes deeply lobed leaves. There is a slight and pleasant aroma when brushing against the foliage. Fruits are dark purple to maroon. Figs love full hot sun and are very drought tolerant but will produce more fruit if watered during the summer. Expect fig tree to die to the ground each year and start growing in May a bit later than other plants. Regrowth is rapid and established figs will have dozens of 5-6' water sprouts loaded with a few hundred fruits by September. You will always get a late summer/fall crop because fruit can come from new wood. If growing as a potted patio plant, grow in full sun with plenty of water during the summer. Then in late fall before temperatures get below 20 degrees F, move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with minimal watering. Do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 15 degrees for more than a few hours. By March or April, the fig will be trying to grow and you may put back outside (protect from late frosts) and you will also have a spring fruit crop. Eat fresh, freeze for fruit smoothies, or dry in sun or food dehydrator. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), several established specimens planted 5-10 years ago and mulched 1-3" with wood mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. 'Chicago Hardy' is considered to be one of the hardiest edible figs producing reliable fruits. It's stems are hardy to 10°F and the roots are hardy to -20°F. Sometimes if prolonged September cold-fronts occur and temperatures are too low at night, green fruits will disappointingly stop ripening. Look for a hot planting location microclimate such as a West or South wall to encourage fruit to ripen. Ripening does not continue to progress if harvested early (when fruit has any green coloring present).

product product
Ficus carica 'Chicago Hardy'
Chicago Hardy Fig (small)
$20.00 $26.00

The common fig (Ficus carica) is native to an area extending from Asiatic Turkey to northern India. In Kansas, plant in a protected area near the house on south or west side but will survive in other locations in full hot sun. As an edible, ornamental plant, figs are an attractive bush-like plant with sandpapery green sometimes deeply lobed leaves. There is a slight and pleasant aroma when brushing against the foliage. Fruits are dark purple to maroon. Figs love full hot sun and are very drought tolerant but will produce more fruit if watered during the summer. Expect fig tree to die to the ground each year and start growing in May a bit later than other plants. Regrowth is rapid and established figs will have dozens of 5-6' water sprouts loaded with a few hundred fruits by September. You will always get a late summer/fall crop because fruit can come from new wood. If growing as a potted patio plant, grow in full sun with plenty of water during the summer. Then in late fall before temperatures get below 20 degrees F, move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with minimal watering. Do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 15 degrees for more than a few hours. By March or April, the fig will be trying to grow and you may put back outside (protect from late frosts) and you will also have a spring fruit crop. Eat fresh, freeze for fruit smoothies, or dry in sun or food dehydrator. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), several established specimens planted 5-10 years ago and mulched 1-3" with wood mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. 'Chicago Hardy' is considered to be one of the hardiest edible figs producing reliable fruits. It's stems are hardy to 10°F and the roots are hardy to -20°F. Sometimes if prolonged September cold-fronts occur and temperatures are too low at night, green fruits will disappointingly stop ripening. Look for a hot planting location microclimate such as a West or South wall to encourage fruit to ripen. Ripening does not continue to progress if harvested early (when fruit has any green coloring present).

product product
Hibiscus 'Berry Awesome'
Berry Awesome Hardy Hibiscus
$25.00 $32.50

Hardy Hibiscus are US native plants that feature very large single petal flowers sometimes as large as a dinner plate. Colors include white, pink, red, magenta, purple with many different combinations. Foliage can range from green to reddish to dark purplish black. Hardy hibiscus breeding to produce improved cultivars has come a long way in the last 10 or 20 years. Hibiscus emerge later than most other perennials, needing the ground to heat up before growing in May. Hibiscus tolerate a wide range of soil conditions including clay and wetness but prefer rich garden soil. Drought is tolerated with established plants although flowering will be reduced. Generally, the 40 inches of rainfall in Eastern Kansas is sufficient. Full sun is best for optimal foliage coloring, growth habit, and flowers. When used in a landscape, hibiscus brings a tropical feel when flowering and are noticeable from very far away. Combine with hardy bananas (musa basjoo) and other contrasting flowers. Groupings of hibiscus are very effective around water gardens, rain gardens, backyard fences, pollinator gardens, and roadside areas where you only have a second to look when driving by. Modern hibiscus cultivars do not set seed and do not need to be deadheaded like old varieties; the result is continuous blooming from July till September. Cool autumn nights below 50 degrees F initiate beautiful fall foliage colors ranging from red and purple to fiery orange. Maintenance is pretty easy: just cut down dead stocks to the ground at some point in fall or winter. A yearly time-release fertilizer is appreciated from most heavily flowering plants. There are some occasional foliage pests for hibiscuses including leaf miners, grasshoppers, and Japanese beetles but these can be treated. If not treated, it generally won’t kill the plant, especially if the plant is otherwise healthy and in good growing conditions. Summerific® 'Berry Awesome' Rose Mallow (Hibiscus 'Berry Awesome') is a Walters Gardens Inc. introduction. Huge 7-8”, ruffled, lavender pink flowers with a cherry red eye are produced all over the densely compact, shrub-like clump of attractive midnight green foliage. Similar color to 'Plum Crazy'. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Hibiscus syriacus 'Purple Pillar'
Purple Pillar Rose of Sharon
$18.00 $23.40

You've never seen a Rose Of Sharon like this before! Purple Pillar® (Hibiscus syriacus 'Purple Pillar') is a totally unique Rose Of Sharon: it naturally grows as a narrow column instead of a wide, spreading plant. It gets to be just 2-3' (.6-.9 m) wide and 10-16' tall! Think of what you could do with that: screens, hedges, patio containers. Anywhere you need a little privacy and/or color in a narrow space, this plant is a great choice. Like most all hibiscus, it will do best in full sun. It is hardy to USDA Zone 5. In summer, each stem is packed along its entire length with purple blooms. This unusual columnar habit makes it a real space saver - if you thought you didn't have enough space to grow Rose Of Sharon, Purple Pillar is perfect for you. Try it in containers, or flanking your front door, or simply as a quirky accent in your landscape. The narrow habit of Purple Pillar Rose Of Sharon means it creates few to no branches, so little to no pruning is required. If you want to prune it, do so in early spring. In areas that experience snowfall, avoid planting it where it might be dumped on by snow falling off of the roof - yours, or your neighbors. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated full sun or part shade. Our typical 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water if planted in good soils. Cold tolerance is no problem. No disease or pest problems. Only issue is that seeds will form and re-seeding does not coming true to form: we recommend spraying round-up as seedling appear around the base of the original true Purple Pillar shrubs. You don't want any "non-pillar" wild troublemakers messing up your line. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Ipomoea pes-caprae
Beach Morning Glory / Railroad Vine (Tropical)
$10.00 $13.00

Beach Morning Glory / Railroad Vine (Ipomoea pes-caprae) is the most rapidly growing annual in out library capable of growing 30-50' in one summer! (100-200' in native coastal dune habitats) It can fill a large annual planting bed with bright green foliage after 1 month when planted in May and taking advantage of early summer rains, heat and humidity. It is also great cascading down retaining walls or large pots! Deep root system will grow in pure sand or typical garden soil provided that regular moisture is available. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water in good soils. The magenta flowers are 2-3" across and absolutely beautiful and will get noticed; blooms sporadically in early summer but covered by late summer and early fall in Kansas. Who would have thought that a coastal sand dune stabilization plant would thrive or even grow at all in Kansas? It has been trialed here as a hanging basket plant, cascading wall plant, and mass groundcover in annual beds. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, it is very difficult as these plants do not like low humidity or low light; best to replace each year.

product product
Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Pink'
Center Stage Pink Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia 'Center Stage Pink' is a new Proven Winners® release. This 3-5' shrub features deep black foliage and pink flowers with yellow stamens; it truly will command center stage in your landscape. Note that this cultivar is wood hardy down to zone 6b. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

product product
Lagerstroemia 'Dark Roast'
Dark Roast Dwarf Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°F, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia 'Dark Roast' is a Walters Gardens, Inc. selection and part of its BARISTA® Collection. It features dark foliage with leaves having red undertones, especially near the tips of the stems. In late summer to early fall, bright fuchsia pink flowers are produced over the fully rounded, compact habit. This is a dwarf selection growing 18-30" tall and wood hardy to about zone 6b. (estimated)

product product
Lagerstroemia indica 'Double Dynamite'
Double Dynamite Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Double Dynamite' is a new variety from Dr. Carl Whitcomb. It would be notable simply for its vivid cherry-red flowers and deep purple foliage, but its ability to bloom continuously on the same panicle make it positively extraordinary. Enjoy over 100 days of bloom on a handsome, disease resistant plant.

product product
Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite'
Dynamite Red Crapemyrtle
$18.00 $23.40

Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is a beautiful summer flowering shrub that dies down to the ground as a perennial each year in Zone 6 Kansas. Flower colors include bright red, pink, magenta, purple, and white. Many cultivars have been released improving foliage color, disease resistance, and flower blooming length. Newer cultivars now have maroon or reddish foliage adding interest before blooming. Beautiful fall color is often overlooked; shades of red, orange, and purple develop when Night temperatures reach into the 40s. In Kansas, crape myrtles grow best with hot south or west exposures or on south facing berms or hillsides. But they are suitable in any garden location as long as they are in full sun, they will build enough energy to come back from complete winter top-kill each year. Generally are 40 inches of rain per year is sufficient without extra watering, but if drought conditions occur, flowering will be reduced or shortened. Brief periods of excessive water and saturated soils are tolerated adding to their versatility. Many people from the south associate Crapemyrtles as a tree. That is true that in Texas and much of the Southeast, beautiful tree forms with exfoliating bark will occur because of mild winters. In Oklahoma and Arkansas for example crapemyrtles are usually grown as large shrubs experiencing major winterkill every 5-10 years. In Kansas and Missouri, or where temperatures regularly get to 0°, all top growth will die back and they will be grown as a woody perennial. After flowering and beautiful fall color is dropped, many people leave crapemyrtles throughout the winter to enjoy the winter interest of the dried seed heads. By March or April, cut plants close to the ground and watch for new growth. Flowering occurs on new wood and is much larger and more dramatic on sprouts from the ground. Flowers are often twice as big when grown this way. In the past, only fast-growing tree size cultivars for appropriate and Kansas because they have the ability to recover the fastest from complete winterkill and grow into a flowering-sized shrub by July. Now there are dwarf cultivars that are wood-hardy to -10 zone 6 for those not wanting to worry about winterkill. No disease or pest problems. Crapemyrtle are awesome for pollinators in the late season garden and especially effective when combined with vitex, butterfly bush, and/or caryopteris. Lagerstroemia indica 'Dynamite', developed by Dr. Carl Whitcomb, was the first true red tree-form crapemyrtle! Dynamite® crapemyrtle produces cherry red flowers on deep green foliage. New spring growth is reddish green. It is both drought and mildew resistant.

product product
Lespedeza thunbergii 'Gibraltar'
Gibraltar Bush Clover
$15.00 $19.50

Gibraltar Bush Clover, is also known as Lespedeza thunbergii 'Gibraltar'

product product
Lilium 'Stargazer'
Stargazer Garden Lily
$25.00 $32.50

Stargazer Garden Lily, is also known as Lilium 'Stargazer'

product product
Magnolia 'Jane'
Jane Magenta Flowering Magnolia
$18.00 $23.40

Jane Magenta Flowering Magnolia (Magnolia 'Jane'), noted for its compact, upright habit, grows best in organically rich, medium-moisture soil that's neutral to slightly acidic. Reddish purple flowers with white interiors open later in spring to avoid frost damage. Flowers do seem to tolerate light freezes down to 28 degrees that have occured here at our Lawrence, KS display garden without damage. Flowers are a gorgeous tulip shape with a lightly scented fragrance. Leaves are medium to dark green turning a beautiful gold in the fall. Jane magnolia makes a great understory small tree, specimen plant, or background shrub slowly growing 10'-15' high. Grows best in full morning sun and partially shaded afternoons in hot climates. Avoid hot West or South exposures and winds. Magnolias in general are a family of plants that have been around for millions of years and are among the most primitive of all flowers. In fact, most magnolia flowers evolved before bees and are thus pollinated by beetles. Magnolias generally grow in moist, well drained soils in sun or shade. They have no serious pests or disease problems. Occasionally seen listed as Magnolia liliflora 'Reflorescens' x stellate 'Waterlily'

product product
Mirabilis multiflora
Wild Perennial Four O'Clock
$13.00 $16.90

Wild Perennial Four O'Clock (Mirabilis multiflora) is a beautiful mound-forming native wildflower found from Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and West to California. Flowers, born over a long period, are bright pink with a magenta center. Foliage is an attractive mint green to grey-green with hints of pink on new growth. This tap-rooted herbaceous perennial can grow up to 2 feet tall and 6 feet across but completely dies back in the fall and does not root as it spreads. A mature plant can have hundreds of flowers blooming at the same time! Flowers last only 1 day but more will follow tthe next day. Self-seeding is rare in our Kansas display garden. Typical landscape uses in Kansas are as follows: annual plantings, parking lot islands, hot West and South exposures, south facing berms, and xeriscape gardens. It will thrive in most soils but not poor drainage. Having desert heritage, it resents poor drainage and winter moisture. To counteract that in Kansas, plant in full sun on berm or south-facing wall with poor sandy or rocky soil with no irrigation. It would be very useful as a vine-like perennial cascading over the top of a retaining wall! Amazing that a perennial native to areas receiving 4-10" of rain per year can grow in a climate receiving 4-10 times more rain!

product product
Musa veluntina
Pink Velvet Hardy Banana Tree
$20.00 $26.00

Create a tropical effect in your landscape with fast-growing cold hardy Pink Velvet Hardy Banana (Musa veluntina)! Leave in ground and mulch 6-9" thick and they will return as perennials every year. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is sufficient without extra water in good soils. This species will tolerate some degree of drought but fastest growth will occur in rich well-drained soils with extra water and fertilizer provided during the summer. Great for wet areas in full sun or around swimming pools (creates no messes). Plants are typically grow 5-8 feet by the end of summer and flower in only 6-8 months! Gorgeous pink and red flowers are followed by inedible pink fruits! Banana trees will slowly divide and send up offsets; this is a desirable sign that the banana tree is establishing well. The flowering trunk will die but many new offsets will take its place. Bananas will not tolerate excessively wet soils during dormancy. Sunburning can happen with summer temperatures over 100 degrees F but it will quickly outgrow the damage. Bananas need at least 1/2 day of full sun and protection from excessive winds to properly grow. Listed by many sources as hardy to zone 7, with proper mulching and placement near a foundation, you can easily grow this in zone 6. An large established grove exists at OSU Botanical Gardens in Stillwater, OK. This grove has proven hardy with no mulch (only frozen back top growth) and lows down to -14 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 12 days on a row with highs below 32 degrees F, 7 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives and 48-60 hours of 5 degrees F and mostly lower. A hard ground freeze was inevitable with no rhizome or lower stem damage.

SCHEDULE SHOPPING APPOINTMENT

No product is added to the cart!

Product has been added to the cart!