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Acer palmatum 'Bloodgood'
Bloodgood Japanese Maple
$175.00 $195.00

Bloodgood Japanese maple (Acer palmatum 'Bloodgood') is a small tree with gracefully branched stems and palmate red-purple leaves that turn bright red in the fall. Bloodgood has improved purplish maroon summer foliage color.Used in Kansas landscapes small lawn tree or understory tree in full to part shade needing rich, moist soils. Even with ideal growing conditions, growth is slow. Avoid afternoon sun in the heat of summer as leaf tips will burn. I have seen tremendous late spring freeze damage on rare occasions.

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Acer palmatum 'Sango Kaku'
Sango Kaku Coral-twig Japanese Maple

Sango Kaku Coral-twig Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum 'Sango Kaku') is a small tree with gracefully branched stems and palmate reddish-green leaves that turn bright red in the fall. Sango Kaku has amazing winter twig color that is a bright coral-red-orange color. Used in Kansas landscapes small lawn tree or understory tree in full to part shade needing rich, moist soils. Even with ideal growing conditions, growth is slow. Avoid afternoon sun in the heat of summer as leaf tips will burn. I have seen tremendous late spring freeze damage on rare occasions so cover if growth has started if the forcast calls for 28 degrees F or lower.

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Acer palmatum var. dissectum 'Crimson Queen'
Crimson Laceleaf Japanese Maple
$175.00 $195.00

Crimson Laceleaf Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum var. dissectum 'Crimson Queen') is typically a much smaller, rounded, slow-growing shrubby form with deeply cut feathery leaves often with cascading branching. 'Crimson Queen' is a maroon red leaf variety. Used in Kansas landscapes as a specimen plant often near a waterfall or focal point. Needs full to part shade with rich, moist soils. Even with ideal growing conditions, growth is slow. Avoid afternoon sun in the heat of summer as leaf tips will burn. I have seen tremendous late spring freeze damage on rare occasions.

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Acer rubrum
Red Maple
$90.00 $117.00

Red maple (Acer rubrum) is a large landscape tree common in Kansas and popular for its red to orange fall color and red spring flowers. While it does well in many soil types including wet compacted clays, it will struggle in an open exposed windy sites if drought stressed. Sun scald is another significant problem that can be prevented with protection or proper siting. The Red Maple has many claims to fame, including the greatest north–south range of any tree species living entirely in the eastern forests from Canada to southern Florida everglades. Its western native range is limited by lack of regular moisture, high pH soils, and intolerance to prairie wildfires.

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Acer rubrum 'October Glory'
October Glory Red Maple
$90.00 $117.00

Red maple (Acer rubrum) is a large landscape tree common in Kansas and popular for its red to orange fall color and red spring flowers. While it does well in many soil types including wet compacted clays, it will struggle in an open exposed windy sites if drought stressed. Sun scald is another significant problem that can be prevented with protection or proper siting. The Red Maple has many claims to fame, including the greatest north–south range of any tree species living entirely in the eastern forests from Canada to southern Florida everglades. Its western native range is limited by lack of regular moisture, high pH soils, and intolerance to prairie wildfires. Acer rubrum 'October Glory' is noted for outstanding, reliable, bright orange to deep, reddish purple fall color - even in warmer climates. Foliage is also held on the tree later into fall than with most cultivars.

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Aesculus pavia
Red Buckeye
$22.00 $28.60

Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia) is a valuable small tree or shrub is native to the southern and eastern parts of the United States. Grow in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in morning sun to full shade. In Kansas, growth is slow but flowers at a very young age when only a couple feet tall making it useful as a flowering shrub for the first 10-20 years. Then you can allow it to grow into a small tree. Tall ruby red flowers bloom for about a month close to redbud bloom timing and hummingbird migration back to the area. Attractive brown fruits are produced in August/September and are favored by squirrels as their first fall nut crop. Foliage is dropped rapidly making it one of the first shrubs or trees to drop its leaves sometimes as early as late September. This is rarely a problem though, as there are many other things happening in the garden in the fall.

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Akebia quinata
Akebia / Chocolate Vine

Five leaf Akebia (Akebia quinata) is a twining vine with green leaves arranged in a palmate shape. Maroon to purple flowers have the slight aroma of chocolate and bloom early in the spring. As with most vines, they are not low maintenance due to their nature and purpose in life. Vines by nature are kind of like freeloaders that want to use other things (and other plants) for free support. This does not directly parasitize the tree but can add a lot of weight (storm damage) and shade out it’s foliage. It requires training to grow on some structures but will generally twine and try to grow to the highest point possible. When properly trained on a trellis or pergola, akebia can be amazing. It will grow in just about any soil and tolerate full shade to full sun. It may be used as a groundcover if nothing to climb on or an edible plant if you pollinate the flowers by hand. There are varieties available that when crossed, produce edible fruit. Akebia is invasive in some parts of the country but this is not the case in Kansas. Blooms occur in march or april very early when frosts are still occurring but with little damage to the plant. Foliage is persistent and semi evergreen until 10-15 degrees F.

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Alocasia odora
Odora Elephant Ear / Alocasia
$40.00 $52.00

Odora Elephant Ear (Alocasia odora) is typically grown in warmer zones and features giant glossy green leaves creating quite a contrast for other colorful flowers in the garden. Most alocasia are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a giant tubers native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. Along with other tropicals and succulents in Kansas, elephant ears are usually grown as summer patio plants. Fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. Protect from temperatures below 28 degrees F and move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with minimal watering. Do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 25 degrees for more than a few hours. Allow to go dormant as needed with little care, just cut off dead foliage and place back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Many plants will die back slowly and remain attractive inside for most of the winter. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by placing a giant 12-18" mound of mulch over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be delayed until June but quickly regains full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), three established specimens planted over 12" deep and mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 strait hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower.

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Amelanchier canadensis
Juneberry / Canadian Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis) is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Eastern North America. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums or American plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier canadensis is also called Shadblow Serviceberry. Great plant for the edible landscape!

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Amelanchier sp.
Mixed Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.) can be a shrub or dwarf tree form with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit, native to North America from Alaska across most of western Canada and in the western and north-central United States. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Great plant for the edible landscape!

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Amelanchier x grandiflora
Apple Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier x grandiflora) is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Eastern North America. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums or American plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier x grandiflora is a hybrid cross between two species of North American serviceberry, namely, A. arborea (downy serviceberry) and A. laevis (Allegheny serviceberry). Great plant for the edible landscape!

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Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance'
Autumn Brilliance Apple Serviceberry
$55.00 $71.50

This serviceberry (Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance') is a deciduous, early-flowering, large shrub or small tree which typically grows 15-25' tall with edible red to bluish-purple berry-like fruit. Native to Eastern North America. Although it is adaptable to a variety of soil and moisture conditions, it shows some drought intolerance so go with sand plums or American plums on a drier site. The delicious fruit of this and related species are eaten fresh or prepared in puddings and pies. You need to act quick before the birds strip them clean. Amelanchier x grandiflora is a hybrid cross between two species of North American serviceberry, namely, A. arborea (downy serviceberry) and A. laevis (Allegheny serviceberry). 'Autumn Brilliance' has brilliant orange-red fall color. Great plant for the edible landscape!

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Amorphophallus konjac
Konjac Voodoo Lily / Amorphophallus
$20.00 $26.00

Voodoo (Amorphophallus konjac) lily is a perennial tuber generally grown as a curiosity for its interesting foliage. The single leaf consists of a stalk (petiole) with mottled pinkish-gray and olive green coloration. The single intricate leaf has horizontal sections giving it a tropical umbrella-like effect. Larger tubers (about the size of a grapefruit or larger) may produce a single "flower" in spring before the foliage appears. The "flower" is actually a large shiny purple to maroon ruffled spathe. When in bloom it produces an odor like a dead animal for 1 day. This is intended to attract the carrion flies that are its natural pollinators. It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by placing a 6-12" mound of mulch over deeply planted tubers. New growth will usually be delayed until June but quickly regains full height and will get bigger each year; buried tubers are hardy to zone 6a. They can also be grown as a flowering summer patio plant. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Plants can get huge and exotic looking as a potted patio plant. Grown in Japan and Korea as an edible corm.

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Andropogon gerardii 'Red October'
Red October Big Bluestem

Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii 'Red October') is easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soils in full sun. It is tolerant of a wide range of soils and growing conditions but tends to flop in rich moist soils. This ornamantal grass is a tall, Kansas native, perennial, warm season grass that dominates much of the tall grass prairie extending into the Flint Hills. In fact, Big bluestem, Indiangrass, Little bluestem, and Switchgrass comprise 75% of the species in this ecosystem. It may be grown as an ornamental grass because of its attractive foliage which changes color seasonally along with its good architectural height and its interesting flower/seed heads. Andropogon gerardii 'Red October' is primarily distinguished from the species by its slightly shorter height, deeper green summer foliage and brilliant scarlet red fall color. An excellent garden performer with a clumping form and upright habit. Leaves emerge deep green with red highlights in spring, remain green through much of the summer, change to purplish-red to purple by late summer and finally turn a vivid scarlet red after first fall frost. Burgundy red flowers bloom in August. Plants typically grow to 6' tall.

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Aristolochia tomentosa
Dutchman's Pipe / Woolly Pipevine

Dutchman's Pipe / Woolly Pipevine (Aristolochia tomentosa) is one of the most rapidly growing vines in out library capable of growing 15-30' in one summer! Native to eastern North America including Missouri, it typically occurs along moist woods and along streams. It can fill a large trellis or arbor with bright green foliage up to 12" across creating the most dense shade of any vine. It needs typical garden soil and regular moisture and is intolerant of drought. In Eastern Kansas, typically our 40 inches of rainfall is close to sufficient without much extra water if planted in good soils. The flowers are 1-2" across but are usually not noticed but is absolutely gorgeous with foliage alone.

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Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima'
Brilliantissima Red Chokeberry
$30.00 $39.00

Red chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima'), is an open, upright, spreading, somewhat rounded but leggy, suckering, deciduous shrub that typically grows 6-10’ tall. It is native to native to both wet and dry thickets in Eastern North America. This 3-season shrub had appeal from spring to late fall starting with white flowers, then deep green summer foliage followed by brilliant red fall color and red berries. Plant in groups or mass plantings in small gardens or open woodland areas. Ability to withstand wet conditions makes it suitable for growing on the margins of ponds, streams, or rain gardens. Watch out for deer can devour young plants (protect with chicken wire if needed) but established plantings can generally outgrow deer browsing which offer free pruning to prevent legginess. The common name of chokeberry is in reference to the tart and bitter taste of the fruits which are edible but so astringent as to cause choking in most of those who try: no it's not poison!. Fruits are renowned for its antioxidant rich berries and high nutritional value and sometimes used to make tasty jams and jellies if enough sugar is added. Included in our "edibles" database but depends on how hungry you are! Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima' grows slowly to 6-8' tall and is perhaps most noted for its attractive glossy red berries and red fall foliage color. It primarily differs from the species by being more compact. It producing more lustrous foliage with superior red fall color. It also produces larger, glossier and more abundant fruit favored by wildlife.

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Asclepias tuberosa
Orange Butterfly Flower / Milkweed
$10.00 $13.00

Orange Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) is a native wildflower with bright orange flowers occurring mostly in dry open habitats and is very common in the prairies and grasslands of the Midwest and Great Plains. Common in Kansas, this beautiful native wildflower is also found from Maine to South Dakota to the desert southwest to Florida. In ideal locations established Butterfly Weeds are very showy with multiple flowering stems spreading across the two foot high plant. Mature plants also have a deep tap root that extends down a foot or more allowing them superb drought tolerance. This rugged species thrives in sunny locations, in dry sandy soil or well-drained loam. More permanent locations include limestone bluffs, rocky prairies, and Great Plains. This wildflower also colonizes readily with wind blown fluffy seeds and will grow under the mower blades sometimes completing their flowering before yearly mowing along state highways. Foliage is often green, upright and attractive. Flowering is long lasting usually 4-6 weeks with interesting seed pods developing later. These eventually open and seeds float away. Reseeding is rare in the garden as mulch will generally eliminate that possibility. In the landscape, Orange Butterfly Weed can be used in any dry soil situation including berms, hot south or west side of the house, or any other full sun area. These will grow in poor rocky, sandy or clayish soils and even rich organic soils as a beautiful flowering annual. With our average 40 inches of rain per year in eastern Kansas, extra irrigation is not recommended. When used as an annual with irrigation and rich garden soil, you can expect the amazing growth and summer flowering followed by a probable root rot in the winter. Orange Butterfly Weed can be planted in parking lot medians and other hell strips as a very durable groundcover. Orange Butterfly Weed can also thrive in an above-ground perennial planter (with appropriate potting soil) year-round surviving the winter coldness in Eastern Kansas (zone 6a/5b). In any situation, combine with any other flower colors except orange. There is quite a lot of diversity within the species so plants from different locales will have different foliage and flower shades adapted to the site. Flower color can range from almost red to pure yellow and everything in between.

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Asimina triloba
Paw Paw Tree
$40.00 $52.00

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri.

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Asimina triloba 'Allegheny'
Allegheny Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Allegheny' is one of the earliest pawpaw trees to ripen. Compared to other varieties, the fruit may be smaller, but its productivity in terms of number of fruits is more than abundant!

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Asimina triloba 'Mango'
Mango Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Mango' features exceptionally large fruit with flavorful yellow flesh. This has the most vigorous growth of pawpaw varieties. Fruit is late ripening.

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Asimina triloba 'NC-1'
NC-1 Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'NC-1' has large, early-ripening fruits and good flavor. The skin is thick with few seeds.

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Asimina triloba 'Overlease'
Overlease Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Overlease' fruits are large with excellent flavor. This tree takes extra time being slow to bear with average production. It is a natural selection found near Rushville, Indiana.

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Asimina triloba 'Pennsylvania Gold'
Pennsylvania Gold Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Pennsylvania Gold' produces good crop of medium to large fruits with sweet, flavorful flesh. It is one of the earliest ripening varieties.

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Asimina triloba 'Potomac'
Potomac Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Potomac' has large, fleshy fruits with sweet, rich flavor and firm, smooth texture. This tree has a more upright habit that other pawpaw varieties.

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Asimina triloba 'Prolific'
Prolific Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Prolific' can be grown as a multi-stemmed shrub or small tree. Great plant for attracting all kinds of wildlife. This is a heavy bearing variety with large, delicious, earlyripening fruit.

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Asimina triloba 'Rappahannock'
Rappahannock Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Rappahannock' is a superior variety with exceptional flavor. Ripe, yellow fruits show well in foliage due to horizontal leaf habit. Fruit is large and symmetrical.

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Asimina triloba 'Shenandoah'
Shenandoah Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Shenandoah' is one of the most popular Peterson varieties. Fruit is large with firm, smooth texture, sweet flavor and good yields.

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Asimina triloba 'Sunflower'
Sunflower Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Sunflower' is a well-known, hardy northern selection with large, tasty fruit. It ripens later than other varieties.

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Asimina triloba 'Susquehanna'
Susquehanna Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Susquehanna' is an outstanding Peterson pawpaw with rich, sweet flavor, exceptional fleshiness, and buttery texture. Susquehanna forms a beautiful ornamental small tree for home landscape.

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Asimina triloba 'Wabash'
Wabash Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Wabash' features sweet fruit with medium firm flesh. It has excellent quality large-sized fruit with good productivity.

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Asimina triloba 'Wells'
Wells Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri. Asimina triloba 'Wells' features large fruit up to one pound each have distinct banana-like flavor.

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Asimina triloba (Fruiting Cultivar)
Paw Paw Tree (Fruiting Cultivar)
$55.00 $71.50

Paw Paw (Asimina triloba) is a tropical looking native understory fruit tree with large green leaves and delicious fruits. Flowers are born on old wood in the early spring and the maroon color is common of flowers meant to attract flies for pollination. Foliage is up to 12 inches long and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn for a couple weeks before falling. If cross pollination occurs, delicious fruits are produced in small clusters. The texture is custard like and taste is a mix between banana, mango, and hint of pineapple. Fruit is very fragile upon ripening and will fall to the ground and splat or be quickly devoured by animals. It is suggested that you put fruit nets around the clusters of fruit or harvest a few days earlier and allow to ripen inside. Fruit is rarely commercially available due to its fragility and short shelf-life. Cleaned fruit may be peeled frozen with seed intact: they can be picked out much easier when thawed out again Paw Paw may be eaten fresh, baked into desserts, or made into ice cream. Paw Paw is native to a large geographical area over eastern United States including Kansas. In the wild, Paw Paw grows in moist rich forest valleys in full to part shade. Best fruiting specimens can also be found on the edge of woodland or clearing in rich soil. Paw Paw tree colonies slowly spread by rhizomes and seem to occupy the forest understory sometimes for decades or centuries waiting for an opening to allow sunlight in. If a large canopy tree (such as an oak) dies or wind storm rolls through clearing a patch, new sunlight and an opening in the canopy occurs paving the way for sexual reproduction to take place (fruits) Paw Paw is somewhat tolerant of poorly drained soil's including clay but growth will be much slower. Interestingly, Paw Paws will tolerate and even need full sun when older to produce fruit. However, young saplings will quickly die in full sun from leaf burn and drought stress. If a tree is at least 4 to 6 tall and is planted in rich soil and full sun with regular irrigation, it will probably be fine. With these growing conditions, trees may grow at a median growth rate instead of slow, putting up 1 to 2 feet of new growth per year. If you have the right conditions for a Paw Paw tree, it should definitely be a part of your landscape whether you are growing for fruit production or not. There are dozens on improved cultivars available now days. In our Lawrence, KS display gardens, we are trialing several of these improved fruiting cultivars from Forrest Keeling Nursery in Missouri.

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Asparagus verticillatus
Hardy Asparagus Vine

Hardy Asparagus Vine (Asparagus verticillatus) makes a wonderful extreme fine textures accent plant in the landscape. The effect is more dramatic when combined with large leaved and bold flowering hardy tropicals. Asparagus verticillatus is native to the Balkan Peninsula, Eastern Europe, Turkey, Northern Iraq, the Caucasus, Iran and Central Asia. Asparagus cochinchinensis 'Chuwang' is perfectly suited to cascade down a retaining wall in the Kansas landscape. The long twining deciduous stalks (upto 10' long) of dark green foliage turn a brilliant gold fall color. Tiny white flowers bloom in mid-May sometimes followed by loads of red fruit. The foliage stays green into the mid-20s F, serving as a perfect background for the red berries. It survived -16 degrees F and a week of single digit highs in Lawrence, KS during February, 2021 without mulch. Beautiful well-established specimens exist at the Denver Botanical Garden (zone 5b) clamoring down a 12' concrete retaining wall; what a great way to hide ugly gray concrete!

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Baptisia 'Honey Roasted'
Honey Roasted False Indigo
$15.00 $19.50

The False Indigo species (Baptisia) features beautiful compact bluish green leaves arranged in groups of three. Like many members in the legume family, they are nitrogen fixing plants which means they produce their own nitrogen in the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. The flowers bloom above the foliage normally in April and May. Common baptisia flower colors include white, purple, lavender, yellow, and pink as well as uncommon colors ranging from deep purple to maroon and even coppery orange. Considered a great North American native three season plant, the foliage always emerges very attractive followed by flowers that do not need deadheading. Foliage generally lasts pretty nice through hot summers and into fall turning black with first freeze. Seed pods also turn charcoal black when ripe and have considerable ornamental interest and useful in dried flower arrangements. At some point in the fall, it can be cut down early for a clean look or left for winter interest. Baptisia generally do well in droughty clay soils in full to part sun. There is only one pest that may create problems called the Genista Broom Moth. It may occur in Kansas when weather conditions are consistently dry and over 95 degrees F. It is treatable if you act fast but if not, it only destroys the foliage late in the season and does not kill the plant. Baptisia has several enormous spreading taproots which store water and energy and can make transplanting difficult. Plantings look good as specimen or in small groups; and it’s ok even preferable if they grow together and touch other plants. That helps eliminate available sunlight and discourages weeds. It is hard to picture a native plant garden or any perennial garden without Baptisia. Considered a once “it’s there, it’s always there” long lived plant. Baptisia 'Honey Roasted' features long 10" spikes of dark mahogany flowers have bright yellow keels, producing a wonderful bicolor effect. The bushy habit is jam-packed with flowers when it is in bloom early in the growing season. Flowers lighten to yellow as the flowers mature. This extremely long-lived perennial could be used instead of a shrub in landscape settings, with minimal care required to thrive year after year.

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Begonia x coralline
Angel Wing Begonia (Tropical)
$20.00 $26.00

Angel Wing Begonia (Tropical), is also known as Begonia x coralline

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Caesalpinia gilliesii
Hardy Bird of Paradise

Hardy Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia gilliesii) is a surprisingly hardy shrub from South America native to Argentina and Uruguay. The extremely fine textured bipennate foliage is fern-like and resembles Mimosa or Amorpha. During spring and summer the lovely foliage takes on a bluish green color. By late summer if conditions are optimal, beautiful flowers appear. The flowers are light yellow with protruding red hair-like stamens that are very showy, drawing in curious visitors. By late fall in our zone 6 climate, the foliage drops and typically the above ground woody part of the shrub freezes back and behaves like a Crapemyrtle or a Butterfly Bush. Trim dead growth in mid-spring and enjoy the new beautiful regrowth by early summer. In order for this shrub to flower, it needs to be well-established, in full sun, and preferably on the south or west side of a foundation. Hardy Bird of Paradise need average to dry well drained soil especially in the winter. Hardiness should not be an issue after seeing mature established plants at the Denver Botanic Garden (zone 5b) in full bloom. The Botanic Garden at Oklahoma State University (zone 7a) also has a few decades old specimens. Wet winter soils could limit its success in zone 5-7 areas in the Eastern United States. It has been thriving in our trial gardens and at several residential gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a) 5-7 years ago. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. It is virtually unknown in most garden centers but worthy of more wide-scale use especially in hot locations.

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Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite'
Aphrodite Sweetshrub / Calycanthus
$8.00 $10.40

Aphrodite Sweetshrub (Calycanthus x 'Aphrodite') is covered in big, glossy, medium-green leaves. This shrub explodes with enormous cupped flowers that look a bit like a deep red magnolia. They start in early summer with a big flush of flowers continuing to bloom sporadically all summer long. This is a quite large shrub that needs plenty of space to look its best, but if you have the room for it, there are few better ways to use it! 'Aphrodite' is a hybrid between our native Calycanthus and the Asian species, x Sinocalycanthus. You're probably wondering if it's fragrant, and the answer is - it depends. The scent varies based on the age of the bloom, the time of day, and the flower itself. Some people say they smell like pineapple, others apples, others bubblegum, and some get no scent at all. Even if you never sense a whiff off this plant, its fabulous flowers are more than enough reward. Prune after flowering to maintain shape. This Calycanthus performs amazingly well in eastern Kansas landscapes. It is great along a woodland edge or in morning sun. When planted in full shade with rich soil in our Lawrence, KS Zone 6a display garden, growth is very rapid and flowers completely cover the shrub for a few weeks in early summer. Yes, you heard right, this shrub is will flower in full shade. It tolerates a wide variety of soil types including clay but needs prefers well-drained soil high in organic matter. Adaptable to mild drought and heat (plant in full shade in southern zones) but greatly improved with rich, moisture-retentive soils. Typically, our 40 inches of rainfall per year in Eastern Kansas is sufficient. Summer foliage is virtually pest-free. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Canna 'Australia'
Dark Red-leaf Water Canna (Tropical)
$25.00 $32.50

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Australia' has maroon leaves and red flowers. This canna can also grow in standing water as a potted plant in water gardens or rain gardens.

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Canna 'Cannova Bronze Scarlet'
Cannova Bronze Scarlet Dwarf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Cannova Bronze Scarlet' is a dwarf variety with reddish leaves and bright red flowers.

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Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo'
Daddy Buckaroo Giant Red-Leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo' is a tall variety with reddish-green leaves and red-orange flowers. This variety is among the most cold hardy of the cannas due to its vigorous deep growing rhizomes. Our original plant came from Brian's Botanicals mail-order nursery in Kentucky.

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Canna indica 'Red Stripe'
Red Stripe Hardy Red-Leaf Canna
$20.00 $26.00

Cannas are typically grown for their continuous summer flowers and vertical wide-leaf foliage. The plants are large tropical and subtropical herbaceous perennials with a rhizomatous rootstock native to areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter cannas is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few pieces. If digging from the ground, just save a chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is possible to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas by mulching 4-8" thick over deeply planted rhizomes. New growth will usually be slightly delayed but quick to regain full height. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Canna 'Daddy's Buckaroo',Canna 'Omega',Canna indica 'Red Stripe',Canna indica 'Ellen's Super Orange', Canna indica 'Wyoming') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. Canna indica 'Red Stripe' is a medium variety with reddish-green leaves and red flowers.

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Cephalanthus occidentalis 'Sugar Shack'
Sugar Shack Dwarf Buttonbush
$18.00 $23.40

Button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is a beautiful rounded shrub with glossy green leaves that turn reddish maroon in fall. White flowers are very unique (and look like a coronavirus) consisting of small spheres with protruding anthers. Bloom occurs all summer and are attractive to many different bee and butterfly species, including the swallowtail butterfly. Red fruiting heads appear in late summer adding to the ornamental appeal! In its native habitat covering most of Eastern United States including disjunct populations in Arizona, California, and Mexico, this wetland shrub can be found in low-lying areas. This includes swamps, marshes, bogs, wetlands, and along the edges of ponds, streams, and rivers. In Eastern Kansas, this is a no-brainer shrub to small tree for average garden soils including heavy clay and useful for rain gardens. Adapts to a wide range of soils except dry ones if in poor soils. Tolerant of moderate drought once established especially if in moisture-retentive rich soils. As a testament to this plants survivability, Clinton Lake and Perry Lake located in NE kansas flooded in 2020 with areas of shore-line underwater for the entire growing season. This killed every other plant species was killed except for buttonbush: all top growth was killed but new shoots from the root systems of thousands of plants along the shore resumed the following year when water receded. Basically, these plants survived over 18 months with no growth from fall of 2019 to spring of 2021. This plant can also grow in permanent standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Sugar Shack® Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis 'Sugar Shack') in a new Proven Winners variety! Although buttonbush has long been prized as a native and great for rain gardens, it was way too big for most landscapes. Not anymore! They cut the size in half and added improved colorful red fruit and glossy foliage. Add in cool looking, fragrant white flowers and you've got a delightful plant that shines from spring to fall. Blooming on new wood, button bush may be trimmed in early spring. Complete rejuvenation may also be done if plants get too big.

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Chaenomeles 'Double Take Orange'
Double Take Orange Flowering Quince
$18.00 $23.40

Double Take® Orange Quince (Chaenomeles 'Double Take Orange') features huge flowers on a thornless plant. It's so beautiful you may overlook its survivalist skills! Heat and drought tolerant, this plant will delight you each spring with candy colored blooms. Double Take Orange puts on a spectacular spring display of large double flowers with intense orange color - you'll do a double take! More than just pretty flowers, the Double Take Quinces are easy to care for, having neither thorns or fruit. Once established, they are extremely drought tolerant. Developed by Dr. Tom Ranney and his team at the Mountain Crops Research & Extension Center in beautiful North Carolina, Orange Storm and the other Double Take Quinces are sure to brighten spring gardens across the United States. Uses Notes: Excellent for hedging, mass planting and cut flower gardens. A spectacular early season specimen for the mixed border. Maintenance Notes: Prune to shape after flowering. Apply a controlled release fertilizer in spring. Formerly known as Double Take 'Orange Storm' quince. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated reasonably well but with some foliage decline by late summer and no fall color. This is made up for by the extremely reliable blooming season that fills up the month of April when many other plants are not in full swing yet. Cold tolerance or flower bud loss is no problem in our zone 6. No serious disease or pest problems. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Chaenomeles 'Double Take Scarlet'
Double Take Scarlet Flowering Quince
$18.00 $23.40

You'll do a double take when you see this quince that looks like a camellia. Double Take Scarlet Quince (Chaenomeles 'Double Take Scarlet') puts on a spectacular early spring display of large red, double flowers. The Double Take quinces are more than just pretty spring flowers: thornless and deer-resistant, they do not produce fruit, and once established, are drought-tolerant survivalists. Developed by Dr. Tom Ranney and his team at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in beautiful North Carolina, the Double Take quinces are sure to brighten spring landscapes across the United States. Uses Notes: Bright early spring flowers are great in mixed borders or cutting gardens. Also good for hedging and mass plantings. Maintenance Notes: Trim to shape after flowering. Apply a controlled release fertilizer in early spring. Formerly sold as Double Take 'Scarlet Storm' quince. In Eastern Kansas, this cultivar performs WELL with just about everything nature has to challenge it! Heat and drought are tolerated reasonably well but with some foliage decline by late summer and no fall color. This is made up for by the extremely reliable blooming season that fills up the month of April when many other plants are not in full swing yet. Cold tolerance or flower bud loss is no problem in our zone 6. No serious disease or pest problems. All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Cotoneaster procumbens 'Little Dipper'
Little Dipper Groundcover Cotoneaster
$18.00 $23.40

A new plant from Proven Winners! Little Dipper® Cotoneaster () is an easy solution to covering large areas of bare ground quickly, inexpensively, and, most important, beautifully. This sprawling shrub is a galaxy of tiny white, five-petaled flowers in spring, which give way to cheery red fruits through summer. Finely textured foliage makes it a restful visual presence in the landscape. It's also a good choice for cascading over retaining walls and high bed edges. Little Dipper cotoneaster is considered a low maintenance groundcover. It has white flowers in spring, red fruit in summer and fall, and fine branches and tiny leaves creating an appealing texture. This trouble-free plant requires almost nothing from its owner. It cannot tolerate being stepped on, so should be planted away from foot traffic. Pay attention to spacing so that it does not grow into lawns or walkways as it matures. If you need to trim it, do so after blooming. You could hardly be blamed for wanting to say "cotton-easter" based on the spelling of this plant's name, but it is actually pronounced "Cot-oh-KNEE-aster." All Proven Winners® plants are legally propagated, healthy and vigorous, true to name, and tagged with color pictures and growing information.

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Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet'
Ellen Bosanquet Red Hardy Crinum Lily
$40.00 $52.00

Crinums are tough, long-lived perennial bulbs with strappy leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. In areas where the bulbs are hardy, (zones 5/6-10) these plants can reach as much as 4 feet across and bloom all summer. Crinums can live for 200-300 years in the South often found growing in cemeteries and abandoned home sites with little or no attention. The plants are native to southeast Asia often in areas with a summer monsoon and dry winter. They can also be grown as flowering summer patio plants. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and place in full sun. You may also plant these in the ground for an enormous tropical effect! It is easy to overwinter these in the ground in Kansas with mulch or no mulch! The trick is to plant them deep: an extra 4-6" deeper than grade or with neck of bulb completely buried. Crinums are extremely adaptable thriving in either in dry or in boggy soils. Crinums are tough, low maintenance bulbs which make them perfect for rain gardens, and although drought-tolerant, crinums bloom more if well-watered. This plant can also grow in standing water or as a potted plant in water gardens. Unlike southern climates, crinums in Kansas need full sun to grow and flower in our shorter growing season. Crinum are more cold hardy than most authorities publish; easily pushing into zone 5 for some varieties. In our trial gardens in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), the following varieties survived after being mulched 6-12" with leaf mulch to -17 degrees F. (Crinum 'Infusion', Crinum tweedianum, Crinum 'Super Ellen', Crinum x powellii, Crinum 'White Prince') During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower. No crinums were lost or harmed during this event! Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet' has dark magenta/red flowers 24" tall

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Crocosmia 'Lucifer'
Lucifer Red Crocosmia
$10.00 $13.00

Lucifer Red Crocosmia (Crocosmia 'Lucifer') are typically grown for their bright red mid-summer flowers and vertical iris-leaf foliage. The plants are temperate and subtropical herbaceous perennial bulbs native to areas with a summer wet season and dry winter. Crocosmia are hardy outside as a perennial when established and with minimal effort at least up to zone 6a. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and plant in full sun. Plant these bulbs in the ground at least 4-6" deep with 3-4" of mulch to enjoy a wonderful tropical flowering effect! Foliage may look bedwraggled by fall so it is ok to cut back foliage at that time. They can also be grown as a flowering summer patio plant. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter crocosmia is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few bulbs. If digging from the ground in colder zones, just save a big chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. In a customer's garden in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), four established specimens planted over 4-6" deep and mulched 2-3" with wood mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower.

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Crocosmia 'Prince of Orange'
Prince of Orange Crocosmia
$10.00 $13.00

Prince of Orange Crocosmia (Crocosmia 'Prince of Orange') are typically grown for their bright orange mid-summer flowers and vertical iris-leaf foliage. The flowers are spaced very close together on the stems, resulting in a more concentrated blast of color from midsummer through late summer. The plants are temperate and subtropical herbaceous perennial bulbs native to areas with a summer wet season and dry winter. Crocosmia are hardy outside as a perennial when established and with minimal effort at least up to zone 6a. During the growing season, fertilize, water regularly, and plant in full sun. Plant these bulbs in the ground at least 4-6" deep with 3-4" of mulch to enjoy a wonderful tropical flowering effect! Foliage may look bedwraggled by fall so it is ok to cut back foliage at that time. They can also be grown as a flowering summer patio plant. If growing as a potted plant and trying to overwinter, allowing the foliage to frost is ok, it will not kill the root system. However, do not allow the pot with rootball to freeze solid or go below 20 degrees for more than a few hours; move into a cold garage or basement over the winter with no watering. Cut back and allow to go dormant and place entire pot back out in April or May with a time-release fertilizer. Another more labor intensive way to overwinter crocosmia is to remove them from the dirt, dust with fungicide, place in box with sawdust, and keep in the refrigerator. We consider this method old-fashioned and too much work but ok if you only want to save a few bulbs. If digging from the ground in colder zones, just save a big chunk with the dirt intact and place into a large pot in the garage. In a customer's garden in Lawrence, KS (zone 6a), four established specimens planted over 4-6" deep and mulched 2-3" with wood mulch survived -17 degrees F. During the arctic blast of February, 2021, lows down to -17 degrees F on Feb 16th, 2021 were recorded. The longevity of this cold blast was also impressive: 10 days on a row with highs of 10-15 degrees F or lower, 8 nights of lows in the single digits and negatives, and 36 straight hours of 0 degrees F and mostly lower.

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